European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 104, Issue 5, pp 813–819

Resistance exercise effects on blood glutathione status and plasma protein carbonyls: influence of partial vascular occlusion

Authors

    • Department of Exercise and Sport ScienceUniversity of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • R. S. Garten
    • Department of Exercise and Sport ScienceUniversity of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • P. D. M. Chee
    • Department of Exercise and Sport ScienceUniversity of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • C. Cho
    • Department of Exercise and Sport ScienceUniversity of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • G. V. Reeves
    • Department of Kinesiology and Health StudiesSoutheastern Louisiana University
  • D. B. Hollander
    • Department of Kinesiology and Health StudiesSoutheastern Louisiana University
  • C. Thomas
    • Department of Kinesiology and Health StudiesSoutheastern Louisiana University
  • K. S. Aboudehen
    • Department of Kinesiology and Health StudiesSoutheastern Louisiana University
  • M. Francois
    • Department of Kinesiology and Health StudiesSoutheastern Louisiana University
  • R. R. Kraemer
    • Department of Kinesiology and Health StudiesSoutheastern Louisiana University
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00421-008-0836-1

Cite this article as:
Goldfarb, A.H., Garten, R.S., Chee, P.D.M. et al. Eur J Appl Physiol (2008) 104: 813. doi:10.1007/s00421-008-0836-1

Abstract

Seven weight-trained males performed both light resistance with partial occlusion (LRO: 30% 1 RM) and moderate resistance (MR: 70% 1 RM) to failure to ascertain whether blood protein carbonyls (PC) and glutathione status was altered compared to partial occlusion (PO) in a counterbalanced fashion. PO was identical in duration to the LRO session and all sessions were on separate days. PC did not differ for the three conditions at PRE (0.05 nM mg protein−1). PC significantly increased for PO and MR over time and was greater than the LRO treatment at POST (0.13 nM mg protein−1). The GSSG/TGSH ratio at PRE did not differ across treatments (8%) whereas the ratio at POST was significantly elevated for PO and MR treatments (17%). In contrast, no change occurred for the LRO session at any time. These results indicate that MR to failure and PO can significantly increase blood oxidative stress but LRO did not elicit oxidative stress.

Keywords

Oxidative stressIschemiaReperfusion injuryGrowth hormone

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008