Original Article

European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 98, Issue 3, pp 234-241

First online:

Creatine supplementation does not enhance submaximal aerobic training adaptations in healthy young men and women

  • T. F. ReardonAffiliated withSchool of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney
  • , P. A. RuellAffiliated withSchool of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney
  • , M. A. Fiatarone SinghAffiliated withSchool of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of SydneyFaculty of Medicine, University of SydneyHebrew SeniorLife and John Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Center on Aging at Tufts University
  • , C. H. ThompsonAffiliated withDepartment of General Medicine, Flinders Medical Centre, Flinders University of South Australia
  • , K. B. RooneyAffiliated withSchool of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney Email author 

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Abstract

The benefits of dietary creatine supplementation on muscle performance are generally related to an increase in muscle phosphocreatine content. However, creatine supplementation may benefit endurance sports through increased glycogen re-synthesis following exercise. This study investigated the effect of creatine supplementation on muscle glycogen content, submaximal exercise fuel utilisation and endurance performance following 4 weeks of endurance training. Thirteen healthy, physically active, non-vegetarian subjects volunteered to take part and completed the study. Subjects were supplemented with either creatine monohydrate (CREAT, n = 7) or placebo-maltodextrin (CON, n = 6). Submaximal fuel utilisation and endurance performance were assessed before and after a 4 week endurance training program. Muscle biopsies were also collected before and following training for assessment of muscle creatine and glycogen content. Training increased quadriceps glycogen content to the same degree (∼20%) in both groups (P = 0.04). There was a significant training effect on submaximal fuel utilisation and improved endurance performance. However, there was no significant treatment effect of creatine supplementation. Creatine supplementation does not effect metabolic adaptations to endurance training.

Keywords

Carbohydrate Endurance Glycogen Performance