Biological effects of inhaled nitrogen dioxide in healthy human subjects

  • P. Brand
  • J. Bertram
  • A. Chaker
  • R. A. Jörres
  • A. Kronseder
  • T. Kraus
  • M. Gube
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00420-016-1139-1

Cite this article as:
Brand, P., Bertram, J., Chaker, A. et al. Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2016) 89: 1017. doi:10.1007/s00420-016-1139-1

Abstract

Purpose

Several epidemiological studies indicate that inhaled nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at low concentrations have been statistically associated with adverse health effects. However, these results are not reflected by exposure studies in humans. The aim of the study was to assess the acute functional and cellular responses to different NO2 concentrations in healthy human subjects with various techniques.

Methods

Twenty-five subjects were exposed for 3 h to NO2 concentrations 0, 0.1, 0.5, and 1.5 ppm in a randomized crossover study design during 4 consecutive weeks. In each subject, lung function, diffusion capacity and exhaled nitric oxide were measured and inflammation markers were assessed in blood, nasal secretions, induced sputum and exhaled breath condensate.

Results

From all lung function indices under consideration, only intrathoracic gas volume was borderline significantly increased after 0.5 ppm (p = 0.048) compared to 0.1 ppm NO2. Regarding the cellular effect parameters, the macrophage concentration in induced sputum decreased with increasing NO2 concentration, although these changes were only borderline significant (p = 0.05).

Conclusion

These results do not suggest a considerable acute adverse response in human subjects after 3 h of exposure to NO2 in the NO2 concentration range investigated in this study.

Keywords

Nitrogen dioxide Exposure Human subjects Topic effects Systemic effects 

Supplementary material

420_2016_1139_MOESM1_ESM.docx (82 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 82 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Brand
    • 1
  • J. Bertram
    • 1
  • A. Chaker
    • 2
  • R. A. Jörres
    • 3
  • A. Kronseder
    • 3
  • T. Kraus
    • 1
  • M. Gube
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Occupational and Social MedicineRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany
  2. 2.Department of Otolaryngology, Klinikum rechts der Isar and Center of Allergy and Environment (ZAUM)Technische Universität MünchenMunichGermany
  3. 3.Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental MedicineLudwig-Maximilians-UniversityMunichGermany