International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

, Volume 81, Issue 6, pp 755–767

Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (UMTS, 1,950 MHz) induce genotoxic effects in vitro in human fibroblasts but not in lymphocytes

Authors

  • Claudia Schwarz
    • Division of Occupational MedicineMedical University of Vienna
  • Elisabeth Kratochvil
    • Division of Occupational MedicineMedical University of Vienna
  • Alexander Pilger
    • Division of Occupational MedicineMedical University of Vienna
  • Niels Kuster
    • Foundation for Research on Information Technologies in SocietySwiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH)
  • Franz Adlkofer
    • Verum, Foundation for Behavior and Environment
    • Division of Occupational MedicineMedical University of Vienna
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00420-008-0305-5

Cite this article as:
Schwarz, C., Kratochvil, E., Pilger, A. et al. Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2008) 81: 755. doi:10.1007/s00420-008-0305-5

Abstract

Objective

Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS) was recently introduced as the third generation mobile communication standard in Europe. This was done without any information on biological effects and genotoxic properties of these particular high-frequency electromagnetic fields. This is discomforting, because genotoxic effects of the second generation standard Global System for Mobile Communication have been reported after exposure of human cells in vitro.

Methods

Human cultured fibroblasts of three different donors and three different short-term human lymphocyte cultures were exposed to 1,950 MHz UMTS below the specific absorption rate (SAR) safety limit of 2 W/kg. The alkaline comet assay and the micronucleus assay were used to ascertain dose and time-dependent genotoxic effects. Five hundred cells per slide were visually evaluated in the comet assay and comet tail factor (CTF) was calculated. In the micronucleus assay 1,000 binucleated cells were evaluated per assay. The origin of the micronuclei was determined by fluorescence labeled anticentromere antibodies. All evaluations were performed under blinded conditions.

Results

UMTS exposure increased the CTF and induced centromere-negative micronuclei (MN) in human cultured fibroblasts in a dose and time-dependent way. Incubation for 24 h at a SAR of 0.05 W/kg generated a statistically significant rise in both CTF and MN (P = 0.02). At a SAR of 0.1 W/kg the CTF was significantly increased after 8 h of incubation (P = 0.02), the number of MN after 12 h (P = 0.02). No UMTS effect was obtained with lymphocytes, either unstimulated or stimulated with Phytohemagglutinin.

Conclusion

UMTS exposure may cause genetic alterations in some but not in all human cells in vitro.

Keywords

Comet assay Micronucleus assay Genotoxic effect Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008