International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

, Volume 81, Issue 8, pp 967–974

Air pollution and ED visits for asthma in Australian children: a case-crossover analysis

Authors

    • Centre for Research, Evidence Management and SurveillanceSydney South West Area Health Service
    • School of Public Health and Community MedicineUniversity of New South Wales
  • Behnoosh Khalaj
    • Environmental Health BranchNew South Wales Health Department
  • Vicky Sheppeard
    • Environmental Health BranchNew South Wales Health Department
  • Geoff Morgan
    • Department of Rural Health (Northern Rivers)University of Sydney
    • Division of Population Health and PlanningNorth Coast Area Health Service
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00420-007-0290-0

Cite this article as:
Jalaludin, B., Khalaj, B., Sheppeard, V. et al. Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2008) 81: 967. doi:10.1007/s00420-007-0290-0

Abstract

Objective

We aimed to determine the effects of ambient air pollutants on emergency department (ED) visits for asthma in children.

Methods

We obtained routinely collected ED visit data for asthma (ICD9 493) and air pollution (PM10, PM2.5, O3, NO2, CO and SO2) and meteorological data for metropolitan Sydney for 1997–2001. We used the time stratified case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression to model the association between air pollutants and ED visits for four age-groups (1–4, 5–9, 10–14 and 1–14 years). Estimated relative risks for asthma ED visits were calculated for an exposure corresponding to the inter-quartile range in pollutant level. We included same day average temperature, same day relative humidity, daily temperature range, school holidays and public holidays in all models.

Results

Associations between ambient air pollutants and ED visits for asthma in children were most consistent for all six air pollutants in the 1–4 years age-group, for particulates and CO in the 5–9 years age-group and for CO in the 10–14 years age-group. The greatest effects were most consistently observed for lag 0 and effects were greater in the warm months for particulates, O3 and NO2. In two pollutant models, effect sizes were generally smaller compared to those derived from single pollutant models.

Conclusion

We observed the effects of ambient air pollutants on ED attendances for asthma in a city where the ambient concentrations of air pollutants are relatively low.

Keywords

Ambient air pollution Asthma Case-crossover Children Emergency department visits

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007