Date: 05 Feb 2004

Effect of different vibration frequencies on heart rate variability and driving fatigue in healthy drivers

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Abstract

Objective

This investigation was to assess the effect of different vibration frequencies on heart rate variability (HRV) and driving fatigue in healthy subjects during simulated driving, by the use of power spectrum analysis and subjective evaluation.

Materials and methods

Sixty healthy subjects (29.6±3.3 years) were randomly divided into three groups, A, B and C, and the subjects of each group participated in the simulated driving for 90 min with vertical sinusoidal vibration (acceleration 0.05 g) of 1.8 Hz (group A), 6 Hz (group B) and no vibration (group C), respectively. Low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of HRV, reflecting sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, and the LF:HF ratio, indicating sympathovagal balance, were measured throughout all periods. All indices of HRV were calculated in the pre-experiment period, mid-experiment period and end-experiment period, and were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance. Subjective responses to a questionnaire were obtained after the simulated task for the three groups.

Results

Significant differences in all indices of HRV were observed between different experiment periods and between any two groups. The ratings of subjective fatigue exhibited significant differences between any two groups.

Conclusion

The drivers’ fatigue ratings were associated with vibration frequencies in simulated driving. The study quantitatively demonstrated that different effects on autonomic nerve activities were induced by different vibration frequencies.