Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology

, Volume 251, Issue 3, pp 629–636

Pediatric eye injuries presenting to United States emergency departments: 2001–2007

  • Grayson W. Armstrong
  • Julia G. Kim
  • James G. Linakis
  • Michael J. Mello
  • Paul B. Greenberg
Trauma

DOI: 10.1007/s00417-011-1917-0

Cite this article as:
Armstrong, G.W., Kim, J.G., Linakis, J.G. et al. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol (2013) 251: 629. doi:10.1007/s00417-011-1917-0

Abstract

Background

The epidemiology of pediatric eye injuries is not well-documented. This study describes the characteristics of non-fatal eye injuries in pediatric patients (<18 years of age) presenting to United States (US) emergency departments (EDs).

Methods

Retrospective cohort study utilizing the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) from 2001 to 2007 to perform a descriptive analysis of eye injury case information for patients <18 years of age, including demographic variables, locales, diagnoses, causes, and hospital disposition.

Results

In 2001–2007, an estimated 1,048,500 (95% confidence interval [CI] 878,198–1,218,801) ED visits for eye injury occurred among children less than 18 years of age, representing a rate of 14.31 per 1,000 children. Males accounted for 61.75% (CI 541,971–752,839) of visits. The rate of eye injury was highest in the 15–17 year old age group (18.74 per 1,000 children; CI 199,224–267,132). The most common diagnosis was contusion/abrasion (53.68%; CI 468,035–657,638). The most frequent cause of eye injury was being struck by or against an object (56.63%; CI 491,760–695,758). The majority of injuries occurred at home (65.84%; CI 382,443–588,416) and took place during the spring and summer (39.26%; CI 343,535–479,888).

Conclusion

This study suggests that the risk for pediatric eye injuries is highest for adolescents 15–17 years of age and at home. Further research is needed to determine risk and protective factors associated with injuries in this age group and location to design appropriate prevention strategies.

Keywords

PediatricsChildrenEye injuryEmergency department

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag (outside the USA) 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grayson W. Armstrong
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Julia G. Kim
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • James G. Linakis
    • 3
    • 4
  • Michael J. Mello
    • 4
    • 5
  • Paul B. Greenberg
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  1. 1.Division of OphthalmologyWarren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Division of OphthalmologyRhode Island HospitalProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsWarren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  4. 4.Department of Emergency MedicineWarren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  5. 5.Department of Community HealthWarren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  6. 6.Section of Ophthalmology, VA Medical CenterProvidenceUSA