Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology

, Volume 250, Issue 6, pp 863–869

Memantine for axonal loss of optic neuritis

Authors

  • Mohammad Riazi Esfahani
    • Farabi Eye Research Center, Department of OphthalmologyTehran University of Medical Sciences
  • Zahra Alami Harandi
    • Farabi Eye Research Center, Department of OphthalmologyTehran University of Medical Sciences
  • Morteza Movasat
    • Farabi Eye Research Center, Department of OphthalmologyTehran University of Medical Sciences
  • Mojgan Nikdel
    • Farabi Eye Research Center, Department of OphthalmologyTehran University of Medical Sciences
  • Mohsen Adelpour
    • Farabi Eye Research Center, Department of OphthalmologyTehran University of Medical Sciences
  • Arezo Momeni
    • Farabi Eye Research Center, Department of OphthalmologyTehran University of Medical Sciences
  • Hamid Merat
    • Qazvin University of Medical Science
    • Farabi Eye Research Center, Department of OphthalmologyTehran University of Medical Sciences
Neurophthalmology

DOI: 10.1007/s00417-011-1894-3

Cite this article as:
Esfahani, M.R., Harandi, Z.A., Movasat, M. et al. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol (2012) 250: 863. doi:10.1007/s00417-011-1894-3

Abstract

Background

To determine the effect of memantine on axonal loss and visual function during the course of optic neuritis (ON).

Methods

Sixty ON patients in a single-center, institutional setting were randomly assigned to the memantine or placebo groups. Patients with first attack of acute unilateral optic neuritis, with visual symptoms of 8 days’ duration or less were enrolled in this trial. No patient had known multiple sclerosis, and none had taken immunomodulatory agent prior to or at the time of presentation. For all patients, the following characteristics were recorded and compared at initial presentation and 3 months afterward: visual acuity, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, visual field parameters (mean deviation and pattern standard deviation), visual evoked potential, and contrast sensitivity.

Results

Fifty-four patients completed the 3-month follow up. There were no significant differences between the placebo and memantine groups for any of the characteristics at initial presentation. After 3 months, the only statistically significant difference between the two groups was in RNFL thickness. Memantine group subjects had higher thickness in nasal (P = 0.01), superior (P = 0.006), inferior (P = 0.01) quadrants and average (P = 0.01). However, temporal quadrant thickness was not different between two groups (P = 0.35).

Conclusion

Memantine was effective in reduction of RNFL thinning, although this structural difference was not associated with improved visual function.

Keywords

Optic neuritisOptical coherence tomographyRetinal nerve fiber layerMemantine

Supplementary material

417_2011_1894_MOESM1_ESM.docx (38 kb)
Appendices A (1)Baseline characteristic of all patients (VA: visual acuity; RNFL: retinal nerve fiber layer). (DOCX 37 kb)
417_2011_1894_MOESM2_ESM.docx (34 kb)
Appendices A (2)Patients’ data at 3 months. (VA: visual acuity; RNFL: retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (μm); MD: mean deviation of visual field; PSD: pattern standard deviation of visual field; P100: values of the time-to-peak of P100 (msec) of visual evoked potential) (DOCX 34 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011