Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology

, Volume 246, Issue 2, pp 267–273

Bacterial adhesion to conventional hydrogel and new silicone-hydrogel contact lens materials

  • Laurent Kodjikian
  • Emmanuelle Casoli-Bergeron
  • Florence Malet
  • Hélène Janin-Manificat
  • Jean Freney
  • Carole Burillon
  • Joseph Colin
  • Jean-Paul Steghens
Basic Science

DOI: 10.1007/s00417-007-0703-5

Cite this article as:
Kodjikian, L., Casoli-Bergeron, E., Malet, F. et al. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol (2008) 246: 267. doi:10.1007/s00417-007-0703-5

Abstract

Background

As bacterial adhesion to contact lenses may contribute to the pathogenesis of keratitis, the aim of our study was to investigate in vitro adhesion of clinically relevant bacteria to conventional hydrogel (standard HEMA) and silicone-hydrogel contact lenses using a bioluminescent ATP assay.

Methods

Four types of unworn contact lenses (Etafilcon A, Galyfilcon A, Balafilcon A, Lotrafilcon B) were incubated with Staphylococcus epidermidis (two different strains) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa suspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Lenses were placed with the posterior surface facing up and were incubated in the bacterial suspension for 4 hours at 37°C. Bacterial binding was then measured and studied by bioluminescent ATP assay. Six replicate experiments were performed for each lens and strain.

Results

Adhesion of all species of bacteria to standard HEMA contact lenses (Etafilcon A) was found to be significantly lower than that of three types of silicone-hydrogel contact lenses, whereas Lotrafilcon B material showed the highest level of bacterial binding. Differences between species in the overall level of adhesion to the different types of contact lenses were observed. Adhesion of P. aeruginosa was typically at least 20 times greater than that observed with both S. epidermidis strains.

Conclusions

Conventional hydrogel contact lenses exhibit significantly lower bacterial adhesion in vitro than silicone-hydrogel ones. This could be due to the greater hydrophobicity but also to the higher oxygen transmissibility of silicone–hydrogel lenses.

Keywords

KeratitisContact lensesBacterial adhesionBioluminescenceSilicone-hydrogel

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laurent Kodjikian
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Emmanuelle Casoli-Bergeron
    • 2
  • Florence Malet
    • 4
  • Hélène Janin-Manificat
    • 1
  • Jean Freney
    • 2
  • Carole Burillon
    • 2
    • 3
  • Joseph Colin
    • 4
  • Jean-Paul Steghens
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyCroix-Rousse University HospitalLyonFrance
  2. 2.University of Lyon, UR-RTI2B, UCBL ILyonFrance
  3. 3.Department of OphthalmologyEdouard Herriot University HospitalLyonFrance
  4. 4.Department of OphthalmologyPellegrin University HospitalBordeauxFrance
  5. 5.Department of Biochemistry, UF21 455Edouard Herriot HospitalLyonFrance