Journal of Neurology

, Volume 261, Issue 4, pp 791–803

Do eye movement impairments in patients with small vessel cerebrovascular disease depend on lesion load or on cognitive deficits? A video-oculographic and MRI study

  • Elmar H. Pinkhardt
  • Hazem Issa
  • Martin Gorges
  • Reinhart Jürgens
  • Dorothée Lulé
  • Johanna Heimrath
  • Hans-Peter Müller
  • Albert C. Ludolph
  • Wolfgang Becker
  • Jan Kassubek
Original Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s00415-014-7275-1

Cite this article as:
Pinkhardt, E.H., Issa, H., Gorges, M. et al. J Neurol (2014) 261: 791. doi:10.1007/s00415-014-7275-1

Abstract

Small vessel cerebrovascular disease (SVCD) is one of the most frequent vessel disorders in the aged brain. Among the spectrum of neurological disturbances related to SVCD, oculomotor dysfunction is a not well understood symptom- in particular, it remains unclear whether vascular lesion load in specific brain regions affects oculomotor function independent of cognitive decline in SVCD patients or whether the effect of higher brain function deficits prevails. In this study, we examined a cohort of 25 SVCD patients and 19 healthy controls using video-oculographic eye movement recording in a laboratory environment, computer-based MRI assessment of white matter lesion load (WMLL), assessment of extrapyramidal motor deficits, and psychometric testing. In comparison to controls, the mean WMLL of patients was significantly larger than in controls. With respect to eye movement control, patients performed significantly worse than controls in almost all aspects of oculomotion. Likewise, patients showed a significantly worse performance in all but one of the neuropsychological tests. Oculomotor deficits in SVCD correlated with the patients’ cognitive dysfunctioning while there was only weak evidence for a direct effect of WMLL on eye movement control. In conclusion, oculomotor impairment in SVCD seems to be mainly contingent upon cognitive deterioration in SVCD while WMLL might have only a minor specific effect upon oculomotor pathways.

Keywords

Small vessel cerebrovascular diseaseOculomotor functionVideo-oculographyCognitionMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Supplementary material

415_2014_7275_MOESM1_ESM.tiff (3.9 mb)
Supplementary Fig. 1. Pattern of oculomotor differences between SVCD patients (red) and controls (blue); median values with 90 % ranges (black bars). Note different scalings depending on parameter type (cf. Table 2 for exact values). Significant differences marked by * (p < 0.01) or ** (p < 0.001). SacGn, saccade gain with target steps of 20°; SacPV, peak velocity of 20°-saccades; SacLat, latency of saccades; RAVS, number of rapidly alternating voluntary back and forth saccades between two fixed targets at 10° left and right within 30 s; HdGn, gain of head component of head-free gaze saccades elicited by target steps of 30°; HdPV, peak velocity of 30° head movements during head-free gaze saccades; SPM1 and SPM2, gain of sinusoidal smooth pursuit eye movements at 0.125 and 0.375 Hz, respectively; DelErr and AntErr, percent errors in the delayed and anti-saccade tasks. Saccade and SPEM measures represent averages of horizontal and vertical movements (TIFF 4,004 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elmar H. Pinkhardt
    • 1
  • Hazem Issa
    • 1
  • Martin Gorges
    • 1
  • Reinhart Jürgens
    • 1
  • Dorothée Lulé
    • 1
  • Johanna Heimrath
    • 1
  • Hans-Peter Müller
    • 1
  • Albert C. Ludolph
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Becker
    • 1
  • Jan Kassubek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of UlmUlmGermany