Journal of Neurology

, Volume 260, Issue 2, pp 590–596

Longitudinal assessment of thrombin generation potential in response to alteration of antiplatelet therapy after TIA or ischaemic stroke

  • W. O. Tobin
  • J. A. Kinsella
  • G. F. Kavanagh
  • J. S. O’Donnell
  • R. A. McGrath
  • D. R. Collins
  • T. Coughlan
  • D. O’Neill
  • B. Egan
  • S. Tierney
  • T. M. Feeley
  • R. P. Murphy
  • Dominick J. H. McCabe
Original Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s00415-012-6684-2

Cite this article as:
Tobin, W.O., Kinsella, J.A., Kavanagh, G.F. et al. J Neurol (2013) 260: 590. doi:10.1007/s00415-012-6684-2

Abstract

The impact of changing antiplatelet therapy on thrombin generation potential in patients with ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is unclear. We assessed patients within 4 weeks of TIA or ischaemic stroke (baseline), and then 14 days (14d) and >90 days (90d) after altering antiplatelet therapy. Thrombin generation was assessed in platelet poor plasma. Ninety-one patients were recruited. Twenty-four were initially assessed on no antiplatelet therapy, and then after 14d (N = 23) and 90d (N = 8) on aspirin monotherapy; 52 were assessed on aspirin monotherapy, and after 14 and 90 days on aspirin and dipyridamole combination therapy; 21 patients were assessed on aspirin and after 14 days (N = 21) and 90 days (N = 19) on clopidogrel. Peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at 14 and 90 days (p ≤ 0.04) in the overall cohort. We assessed the impact of individual antiplatelet regimens on thrombin generation parameters to investigate the cause of this effect. Lag time and time-to-peak thrombin generation were unchanged at 14 days, but reduced 90 days after commencing aspirin (p ≤ 0.009). Lag time, peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at both 14 and 90 days after adding dipyridamole to aspirin (p ≤ 0.01). Lag time was reduced 14 days after changing from aspirin to clopidogrel (p = 0.045), but this effect was not maintained at 90 days (p = 0.2). This pilot study did not show any consistent effects of commencing aspirin, or of changing from aspirin to clopidogrel on thrombin generation potential during follow-up. The addition of dipyridamole to aspirin led to a persistent reduction in peak and total thrombin generation ex vivo, and illustrates the diverse, potentially beneficial, newly recognised ‘anti-coagulant’ effects of dipyridamole in ischaemic CVD.

Keywords

Thrombin generation potentialTIAStrokeAspirinDipyridamoleClopidogrelAntiplatelet responsiveness

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. O. Tobin
    • 1
  • J. A. Kinsella
    • 1
  • G. F. Kavanagh
    • 1
  • J. S. O’Donnell
    • 5
  • R. A. McGrath
    • 5
  • D. R. Collins
    • 2
    • 3
  • T. Coughlan
    • 2
    • 3
  • D. O’Neill
    • 2
    • 3
  • B. Egan
    • 4
  • S. Tierney
    • 4
  • T. M. Feeley
    • 4
  • R. P. Murphy
    • 1
    • 3
  • Dominick J. H. McCabe
    • 1
    • 3
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyThe Adelaide and Meath Hospital, incorporating the National Children’s Hospital (AMNCH), Trinity College DublinDublinIreland
  2. 2.Department of Age-Related Health CareThe Adelaide and Meath Hospital, incorporating the National Children’s Hospital (AMNCH), Trinity College DublinDublinIreland
  3. 3.Stroke ServiceThe Adelaide and Meath Hospital, incorporating the National Children’s Hospital (AMNCH), Trinity College DublinDublinIreland
  4. 4.Department of Vascular SurgeryThe Adelaide and Meath Hospital, incorporating the National Children’s Hospital (AMNCH), Trinity College DublinDublinIreland
  5. 5.Haemostasis Research GroupSt James’s Hospital, Trinity College DublinDublinIreland
  6. 6.Department of Clinical NeurosciencesRoyal Free Campus, UCL Institute of NeurologyLondonUK