Journal of Neurology

, Volume 259, Issue 3, pp 530–536

Distribution of white matter hyperintensity in cerebral hemorrhage and healthy aging

  • Yi-Cheng Zhu
  • Hugues Chabriat
  • Ophélia Godin
  • Carole Dufouil
  • Jonathan Rosand
  • Steven M. Greenberg
  • Eric E. Smith
  • Christophe Tzourio
  • Anand Viswanathan
Original Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s00415-011-6218-3

Cite this article as:
Zhu, YC., Chabriat, H., Godin, O. et al. J Neurol (2012) 259: 530. doi:10.1007/s00415-011-6218-3

Abstract

We compared the severity of white matter T2-hyperintensities (WMH) in the frontal lobe and occipital lobe using a visual MRI score in 102 patients with lobar intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) diagnosed with possible or probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), 99 patients with hypertension-related deep ICH, and 159 normal elderly subjects from a population-based cohort. The frontal-occipital (FO) gradient was used to describe the difference in the severity of WMH between the frontal lobe and occipital lobe. A higher proportion of subjects with obvious occipital dominant WMH (FO gradient ≤−2) was found among patients with lobar ICH than among healthy elderly subjects (FO gradient ≤−2: 13.7 vs. 5.7%, p = 0.03). Subjects with obvious occipital dominant WMH were more likely to have more WMH (p = 0.0006) and a significantly higher prevalence of the apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (45.8% vs. 19.4%, p = 0.04) than those who had obvious frontal dominant WMH. This finding is consistent with the relative predilection of CAA for posterior brain regions, and suggests that white matter lesions may preferentially occur in areas of greatest vascular pathology.

Keywords

Intercerebral hemorrhageWhite matter hyperintensityCerebral amyloid angiopathy

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yi-Cheng Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hugues Chabriat
    • 2
  • Ophélia Godin
    • 3
    • 4
  • Carole Dufouil
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jonathan Rosand
    • 5
  • Steven M. Greenberg
    • 6
  • Eric E. Smith
    • 6
    • 7
  • Christophe Tzourio
    • 3
    • 4
  • Anand Viswanathan
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyPeking Union Medical College HospitalBeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of Neurology CHU LariboisièreAssistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, INSERM U740ParisFrance
  3. 3.Unit 708 NeuroepidemiologyINSERMParisFrance
  4. 4.UPMC Univ Paris 6ParisFrance
  5. 5.Center for Human Genetic ResearchMassachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  6. 6.Department of Neurology, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research ProgramMassachusetts General Hospital Stroke Research Center, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  7. 7.Calgary Stroke Program, Department of Clinical NeurosciencesUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada