Journal of Neurology

, Volume 255, Issue 3, pp 347–352

Effect of aspirin and warfarin on early survival after intracerebral haemorrhage

  • H. C. Hanger
  • V. J. Fletcher
  • T. J. Wilkinson
  • A. J. Brown
  • C. M. Frampton
  • R. Sainsbury
ORIGINAL COMMUNICATION

DOI: 10.1007/s00415-008-0650-z

Cite this article as:
Hanger, H.C., Fletcher, V.J., Wilkinson, T.J. et al. J Neurol (2008) 255: 347. doi:10.1007/s00415-008-0650-z

Abstract

Background

To determine whether taking aspirin or warfarin at the time of an intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) has an independent effect on early survival.

Methods

All people with ICH presenting in Christchurch, New Zealand over a three-year period were identified. Independent predictors of mortality at 7, 14 and 28 days were calculated using binary logistic regression.

Results

Two hundred and fifty three cases were identified. Unadjusted 28-day mortality was 43% overall, but 53 % for warfarin associated ICH and 43% for patients taking aspirin. Haemorrhage volume, haemorrhage location, intraventricular spread and the use of warfarin were all independently and significantly associated with mortality at all three time intervals (7, 14 and 28 days). The effect of warfarin was apparent despite similar volumes of bleed in each group. Aspirin was not associated with increased early mortality. Increasing age was also an independent predictor associated with death at 28 days.

Interpretation

Use of warfarin (but not aspirin) immediately prior to ICH was independently associated with increased mortality, after controlling for comorbidities. Thus therapeutic efforts to rapidly reverse the warfarin induced coagulopathy may be justified to lower mortality.

Key words

intracerebral haemorrhagewarfarinaspirinsurvivalmortality

Copyright information

© Steinkopff-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. C. Hanger
    • 1
  • V. J. Fletcher
    • 2
  • T. J. Wilkinson
    • 3
  • A. J. Brown
    • 4
  • C. M. Frampton
    • 5
  • R. Sainsbury
    • 3
  1. 1.Older Persons HealthThe Princess Margaret HospitalChristchurchNew Zealand
  2. 2.General Physician/GeriatricianChristchurch and The Princess Margaret Hospitals ChristchurchNew Zealand
  3. 3.Professor/GeriatricianChristchurch School of Medicine and Health SciencesChristchurchNew Zealand
  4. 4.Registrar, Anaesthetics DepartmentMiddlemore HospitalAuckland
  5. 5.Associate Professor/StatisticianChristchurch School of Medicine and Health SciencesChristchurchNew Zealand