Journal of Neurology

, Volume 254, Issue 2, pp 160–168

Antimyelin antibodies in clinically isolated syndromes correlate with inflammation in MRI and CSF

  • Jens Kuhle
  • Raija L.P. Lindberg
  • Axel Regeniter
  • Matthias Mehling
  • Francine Hoffmann
  • Markus Reindl
  • Thomas Berger
  • Ernst W. Radue
  • David Leppert
  • Ludwig Kappos
ORIGINAL COMMUNICATION

DOI: 10.1007/s00415-006-0299-4

Cite this article as:
Kuhle, J., Lindberg, R.L., Regeniter, A. et al. J Neurol (2007) 254: 160. doi:10.1007/s00415-006-0299-4

Abstract

Objective

We investigated the correlation of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein- (anti-MOG) and anti-myelin basic protein antibodies (anti-MBP) in serum of CIS patients with inflammatory signs in MRI and in CSF and, as previously suggested, the incidence of more frequent and rapid progression to clinically definite MS (CDMS).

Methods

133 CIS patients were analysed for anti-MOG and anti-MBP (Western blot). Routine CSF and cranial MRI (quantitatively and qualitatively) measures were analyzed. 55 patients had a follow-up of at least 12 months or until conversion to CDMS.

Results

Patients with anti-MOG and anti-MBP had an increased intrathecal IgG production and CSF white blood cell count (p = 0.048 and p = 0.036). When anti-MBP alone, or both antibodies were present the cranial MRI showed significantly more T2 lesions (p = 0.007 and p = 0.01, respectively). There was a trend for more lesion dissemination in anti-MBP positive patients (p = 0.076). Conversely, anti-MOG- and/or anti-MBP failed to predict conversion to CDMS in our follow-up group (n = 55). Only in female patients with at least one MRI lesion (n = 34) did the presence of anti-MOG correlate with more frequent (p = 0.028) and more rapid (p = 0.0209) transition to CDMS.

Conclusions

Presence of anti-MOG or anti-MBP or both was not significantly associated with conversion to CDMS in our CIS cohort. However, patients with anti-MOG and anti-MBP had higher lesion load and more disseminated lesions in cranial MRI as well as higher values for CSF leucocytes and intrathecal IgG production. Our data support a correlation of anti-MOG and anti-MBP to inflammatory signs in MRI and CSF. The prognostic value of these antibodies for CDMS, however, seems to be less pronounced than previously reported.

Keywords

clinically isolated syndromeprognosismultiple sclerosisantimyelin antibodies

Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag Darmstadt 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jens Kuhle
    • 1
    • 2
  • Raija L.P. Lindberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • Axel Regeniter
    • 3
  • Matthias Mehling
    • 1
    • 2
  • Francine Hoffmann
    • 1
    • 2
  • Markus Reindl
    • 5
  • Thomas Berger
    • 5
  • Ernst W. Radue
    • 4
  • David Leppert
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  • Ludwig Kappos
    • 1
    • 2
    • 7
  1. 1.Dept. of NeurologyUniversity Hospital BaselBaselSwitzerland
  2. 2.Clinical Neuroimmunology Laboratory, Dept. of ResearchUniversity Hospital BaselBaselSwitzerland
  3. 3.Clinical Chemistry LaboratoryUniversity Hospital BaselBaselSwitzerland
  4. 4.Dept. of NeuroradiologyUniversity Hospital BaselBaselSwitzerland
  5. 5.Clinical Dept. of NeurologyInnsbruck Medical UniversityInnsbruckAustria
  6. 6.Biomarker and Experimental Medicine UnitsAddenbroke’s Centre for Clinical Investigation, GlaxoSmithKline R & DCambridgeGreat Britain
  7. 7.Head Outpatients Clinics Neurology and NeurosurgeryUniversity Hospital BaselBaselSwitzerland