Journal of Neurology

, Volume 250, Supplement 3, pp iii44–iii46

Do patients with Parkinson’s disease benefit from embryonic dopamine cell transplantation?

  • Curt R. Freed
  • Maureen A. Leehey
  • Michael Zawada
  • Kimberly Bjugstad
  • Laetitia Thompson
  • Robert E. Breeze

DOI: 10.1007/s00415-003-1308-5

Cite this article as:
Freed, C.R., Leehey, M.A., Zawada, M. et al. J Neurol (2003) 250: iii44. doi:10.1007/s00415-003-1308-5

Abstract.

Embryonic dopamine cell transplants survive in nearly all patients regardless of age and without immunosuppression. Transplants can improve Parkinson “off” symptoms up to the best effects of L-dopa observed preoperatively. They cannot improve the “best on” state. Transplants appear to survive indefinitely. In 10 to 15% of patients, transplants can reproduce the dyskinetic effects of L-dopa even after discontinuing all L-dopa. Neurotransplantation should be tried earlier in the clinical course of Parkinson’s to see if earlier intervention can prevent progression of the disease, particularly the dyskinetic responses seen after longterm L-dopa treatment.

Key words

putamenpositron emission tomography (PET)fluorodopaembryonic stem cellsdouble-blindneurosurgery

Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Curt R. Freed
    • 1
  • Maureen A. Leehey
    • 1
  • Michael Zawada
    • 1
  • Kimberly Bjugstad
    • 1
  • Laetitia Thompson
    • 1
  • Robert E. Breeze
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine, Neurology, Psychiatry, and Neurosurgery BoxUniversity of Colorado School of MedicineDenverUSA