Journal of Neurology

, Volume 250, Issue 9, pp 1094–1098

Apolipoprotein E genotype does not influence the progression of multiple sclerosis

Authors

  • Giovanni SavettieriMD
    • Institute of NeuropsychiatryUniversity of Palermo
  • Virginia AndreoliPhD
    • Institute of Neurological SciencesNational Research Council
  • Simona BonavitaMD
    • Dept. of Neurological Sciences2nd University of Naples
  • Rita CittadellaPhD
    • Institute of Neurological SciencesNational Research Council
  • Carlo CaltagironeMD
    • Cattedra di Neurologia and I.R.C.C.S., Fondazione "S. Lucia"University of Rome "Tor Vergata"
  • Maria Carolina FazioMD
    • Dept. of Neurosciences, Psychiatry and AnaesthesiologyUniversity of Messina
  • Paolo GirlandaMD
    • Dept. of Neurosciences, Psychiatry and AnaesthesiologyUniversity of Messina
  • Francesco Le PiraMD
    • Dept. of Neurological SciencesUniversity of Catania
  • Maria LiguoriMD
    • Dept. of Neurological and Psychiatric SciencesUniversity of Bari
  • Giancarlo LogroscinoMD
    • Dept. of NeurologyOspedale Miulli
  • Alessandra LugaresiMD
    • Dept. of Oncology & NeuroscienceUniversity of Chieti "Gabriele d’Annunzio"
  • Ugo NocentiniMD
    • Cattedra di Neurologia and I.R.C.C.S., Fondazione "S. Lucia"University of Rome "Tor Vergata"
  • Arturo ReggioMD
    • Dept. of Neurological SciencesUniversity of Catania
  • Giuseppe SalemiMD
    • Institute of NeuropsychiatryUniversity of Palermo
  • Paolo SerraPhD
    • Institute of Neurological SciencesNational Research Council
  • Gioacchino TedeschiMD
    • Dept. of Neurological Sciences2nd University of Naples
  • Lucia TomaMD
    • Dept. of Oncology & NeuroscienceUniversity of Chieti "Gabriele d’Annunzio"
  • Maria TrojanoMD
    • Dept. of Neurological and Psychiatric SciencesUniversity of Bari
  • Paola ValentinoMD
    • Institute of NeurologyUniversity Magna Graecia
    • Institute of Neurological SciencesNational Research Council
    • Institute of NeurologyUniversity Magna Graecia
    • Clinica NeurologicaPoliclinico Mater Domini
ORIGINAL COMMUNICATION

DOI: 10.1007/s00415-003-0163-8

Cite this article as:
Savettieri, G., Andreoli, V., Bonavita, S. et al. J Neurol (2003) 250: 1094. doi:10.1007/s00415-003-0163-8

Abstract.

Objective:

To investigate the association between apolipoprotein E (APOE) polymorphisms and the progression of MS.

Methods:

We investigated 428 subjects affected by clinically defined MS, with a disease duration of at least three years. We collected data concerning the age at onset of MS, clinical type, disease duration and disability according to the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). We also calculated the progression index (PI) to evaluate disease progression. APOE genotyping and the –491 A/T polymorphism of the APOE promoter were determined.

Results:

No association was observed between the APOE ε4 allele and clinical characteristics of our study population. We also investigated the –491 A/T APOE promoter polymorphism in 236 MS subjects and did not find any association between the –491 A/T polymorphism and the selected clinical variables.

Conclusions:

In our population the APOE ε4 allele and the –491 A/T APOE promoter polymorphism are not associated with a more rapid course of MS.

Key words

multiple sclerosisAPOE polymorphismAPOE promoterMS progression

Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag 2003