Original Paper

Radiation and Environmental Biophysics

, Volume 50, Issue 1, pp 145-154

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Analysis of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines

  • Hendrik A. WolffAffiliated withDepartment of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen
  • , David RolkeAffiliated withDepartment of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen
  • , Margret Rave-FränkAffiliated withDepartment of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen Email author 
  • , Markus SchirmerAffiliated withDepartment of Pharmacology, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen
  • , Wolfgang EichelerAffiliated withDepartment of Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden
  • , Annegret DoerflerAffiliated withDepartment of Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden
  • , Andrea HilleAffiliated withDepartment of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen
  • , Clemens F. HessAffiliated withDepartment of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen
  • , Christoph MatthiasAffiliated withDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen
    • , Ralph M. W. RödelAffiliated withDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen
    • , Hans ChristiansenAffiliated withDepartment of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen

Abstract

The purpose of this work was to analyze chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in untreated and in irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) tumor cell lines, aiming at the establishment of assays to test for the relevance of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in the response of SCCHN to radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy. Five low passage and 10 established SCCHN lines, as well as two normal cell lines, were irradiated at 2 Gy or sham-irradiated, and harvested between 1 and 48 h after treatment. For chemokines with CC and CXC structural motifs and their receptors, transcript levels of target and reference genes were quantified relatively by real-time PCR. In addition, CXCL1 and CXCL12 protein expression was analyzed by ELISA. A substantial variation in chemokine and chemokine receptor expression between SCCHN was detected. Practically, all cell lines expressed CCL5 and CCL20, while CCL2 was expressed in normal cells and in some of the tumor cell lines. CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CXCL10, and CXCL11 were expressed in the vast majority of the cell lines, while the expression of CXCL9 and CXCL12 was restricted to fibroblasts and few tumor cell lines. None of the analyzed cell lines expressed the chemokines CCL3, CCL4, or CCL19. Of the receptors, transcript expression of CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, CCR7, CCXR2, and CCXR3 was not detected, and CCR6, CXCR1, and CXCR4 expression was restricted to few tumor cells. Radiation caused up- and down-regulation with respect to chemokine expressions, while for chemokine receptor expressions down-regulations were prevailing. CXCL1 and CXCL12 protein expression corresponded well with the mRNA expression. We conclude that the substantial variation in chemokine and chemokine receptor expression between SCCHN offer opportunities for the establishment of assays to test for the relevance of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in the response of SCCHN to radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy.