Lung

, Volume 191, Issue 4, pp 337–343

Exercise Capacity Affects Quality of Life in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

  • Michael Halank
  • Franziska Einsle
  • Stephanie Lehman
  • Hinrich Bremer
  • Ralf Ewert
  • Heinrike Wilkens
  • F. Joachim Meyer
  • Ekkehard Grünig
  • Hans-Jürgen Seyfarth
  • Martin Kolditz
  • Gesine Wieder
  • Gert Höffken
  • Volker Köllner
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00408-013-9472-6

Cite this article as:
Halank, M., Einsle, F., Lehman, S. et al. Lung (2013) 191: 337. doi:10.1007/s00408-013-9472-6

Abstract

Background

The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the impact of exercise capacity, mental disorders, and hemodynamics on quality-of-life (QoL) parameters in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).

Methods

Sixty-three patients with invasively diagnosed PAH (n = 48) or CTEPH (n = 15) underwent a broad panel of assessments, including cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), 6-minute walking distance (6-MWD), World Health Organization functional class (WHO-FC), and assessment of hemodynamics. QoL was evaluated by the 36-item Medical Outcome Study Short Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36). Exercise capacity, hemodynamics, age, gender, and mental disorders (anxiety and depression) were assessed for association with QoL subscores by uni- and multivariate regression analyses.

Results

Exercise capacity, WHO-FC, oxygen therapy, symptoms of right heart failure, right atrial pressure, and mental disorders were significantly associated with QoL (p < 0.05). In the stepwise backward selection multivariate analysis, depression remained an independent parameter in seven of eight subscales of the SF-36. Furthermore, peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) during CPET, 6-MWD, anxiety, long-term oxygen therapy, right heart failure, and age remained independent factors for QoL. Hemodynamic parameters at rest did not independently correlate with any domain of the SF-36 QoL subscores.

Conclusions

Mental disorders, exercise capacity, long-term oxygen therapy, right heart failure, and age play important role in the quality of life in patients with PAH and CTEPH.

Keywords

Pulmonary arterial hypertension Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension Quality of life 6-Minute walk distance Peak oxygen uptake Anxiety Depression 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Halank
    • 1
  • Franziska Einsle
    • 2
  • Stephanie Lehman
    • 3
  • Hinrich Bremer
    • 4
  • Ralf Ewert
    • 5
  • Heinrike Wilkens
    • 6
  • F. Joachim Meyer
    • 7
  • Ekkehard Grünig
    • 8
  • Hans-Jürgen Seyfarth
    • 9
  • Martin Kolditz
    • 1
  • Gesine Wieder
    • 2
  • Gert Höffken
    • 1
  • Volker Köllner
    • 10
    • 11
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine ICarl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Technical University of DresdenDresdenGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Clinical Psychology and PsychotherapyTechnical University of DresdenDresdenGermany
  3. 3.Department of Nuclear MedicineCarl Gustav Carus University Hospital of the Technical University of DresdenDresdenGermany
  4. 4.Department of Internal MedicineSchwarzwald-Baar KlinikumDonaueschingenGermany
  5. 5.Department of Internal Medicine BErnst-Moritz-Arndt UniversityGreifswaldGermany
  6. 6.Department of Respiratory MedicineSaarland University HospitalHomburgGermany
  7. 7.Division of Internal Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine and GastroenterologyKlinikum HarlachingMunichGermany
  8. 8.Centre for Pulmonary HypertensionThoraxclinic at University HospitalHeidelbergGermany
  9. 9.Department of Pulmonary MedicineUniversity HospitalLeipzigGermany
  10. 10.Institute of Psychoanalysis, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine, Saarland University HospitalHomburgGermany
  11. 11.Department of Psychosomatic MedicineMediclin Bliestal KlinikenBlieskastelGermany