Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics

, Volume 289, Issue 2, pp 341–348

Evaluation of active camera control systems in gynecological surgery: construction, handling, comfort, surgeries and results

  • Luisa Beckmeier
  • Rüdiger Klapdor
  • Phillip Soergel
  • Sudip Kundu
  • Peter Hillemanns
  • Hermann Hertel
General Gynecology

DOI: 10.1007/s00404-013-3004-8

Cite this article as:
Beckmeier, L., Klapdor, R., Soergel, P. et al. Arch Gynecol Obstet (2014) 289: 341. doi:10.1007/s00404-013-3004-8

Abstract

Objective

Surgeon-controlled endoscope leading assistance systems are a novelty in endoscopic surgery. These systems were evaluated for their applicability and reliability in operative gynecology. In this regard, we evaluated possible methods of operation, operative time, setup time, and comfort for the surgeon, complications, blood transfusions, length of stay, hemoglobin levels, and demographic data.

Methods

Two systems with technically identical camera control systems were applied, the SOLOASSIST™ system and the Einstein Vision™ 3D system. The arm systems are attached to the operating table and controlled by surgeon via a manual control, a remote control or a foot switch. Comfort for the surgeon was evaluated using a questionnaire (scale 1–5; 1 “very good”, 5 “poor”). All data were collected prospectively in a database (IBM SPSS Statistics 20) and evaluated.

Results

One hundred and four patients underwent surgery supported by an active control system. In 43 (41 %) cases, oncological interventions were performed. Average setup time was 7 (3–30) min. There was a significant learning curve regarding the mounting of the system after 20 operations (p = 0.045). Overall comfort was rated as “good”, divided into control 2.2 (2–4), physical effort 2.1 (1–4), picture quality 1.6 (1–3), and overall satisfaction 2.1 (1–4). About 75 unwanted camera movements were noticed in 104 surgeries. Complications occurred in no case (0 %).

Conclusion

The application of an active camera control system was evaluated to be safe for all gynecological laparoscopies. Picture blur is avoided even during prolonged complex procedures. Moreover, the assistant is able to support the surgeon with two instruments, with the result that the presence of a second assistant is not required for complex interventions. Causing only minimal setup time, the examined active control systems improve the effectiveness of surgeries. The physical effort required for the assistant decreases and, by reducing tiring operations and tremor, subsequently, higher precision is reached.

Keywords

LaparoscopyActive camera control systemsSOLOASSIST™Einstein Vision™3D surgery

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luisa Beckmeier
    • 1
  • Rüdiger Klapdor
    • 1
  • Phillip Soergel
    • 1
  • Sudip Kundu
    • 1
  • Peter Hillemanns
    • 1
  • Hermann Hertel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department for Obstetrics and GynecologyMedical School HannoverHannoverGermany