Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics

, Volume 286, Issue 3, pp 711–715

Sister Mary Joseph’s nodule associated with rare endometrial squamous cell carcinoma

Authors

  • Mohammed Tanjimur Rahman
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyShimane University School of Medicine
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyShimane University School of Medicine
  • Munmun Rahman
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyShimane University School of Medicine
  • Naomi Nakayama
    • Department of BiochemistryShimane University School of Medicine
  • Masako Ishikawa
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyShimane University School of Medicine
  • Atsuko Katagiri
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyShimane University School of Medicine
  • Hiroshi Katagiri
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyShimane University School of Medicine
  • Tomoka Ishibashi
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyShimane University School of Medicine
  • Kouji Iida
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyShimane University School of Medicine
  • Kohji Miyazaki
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyShimane University School of Medicine
Gynecologic Oncology

DOI: 10.1007/s00404-012-2356-9

Cite this article as:
Rahman, M.T., Nakayama, K., Rahman, M. et al. Arch Gynecol Obstet (2012) 286: 711. doi:10.1007/s00404-012-2356-9

Abstract

Background

Umbilical metastasis (Sister Mary Joseph’s nodule) is a rare physical sign seen only in 1–3 % of patients with an intra-abdominal and/or pelvic malignancy. Here, we present a case of Sister Mary Joseph’s (SMJN) nodule originating from a primary squamous cell carcinoma of the endometrium, a rare histological subtype.

Case history

SMJN was detected in a 30-year-old woman after a preoperative CT scan for a suspected umbilical hernia. Subsequent laparotomy and histopathological examination confirmed endometrial squamous cell carcinoma metastasizing to the umbilical region.

Conclusion

The SMJN may be the first presenting sign of an intra-abdominal and/or pelvic malignancy and may co-exist with an umbilical hernia. Therefore, malignancy should be considered one of the differentials of an umbilical mass.

Keywords

Sister Mary Joseph’s noduleUmbilical herniaPrimary endometrial squamous cell carcinoma

Abbreviations

SMJN

Sister Mary Joseph’s nodule

PESCC

Primary endometrial squamous cell carcinoma

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012