Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics

, Volume 282, Issue 2, pp 127–134

The impact of obesity on spontaneous and medically indicated preterm birth among adolescent mothers

  • Hamisu M. Salihu
  • Sabrina Luke
  • Amina P. Alio
  • Aaron Deutsch
  • Phillip J. Marty
Materno-fetal Medicine

DOI: 10.1007/s00404-009-1213-y

Cite this article as:
Salihu, H.M., Luke, S., Alio, A.P. et al. Arch Gynecol Obstet (2010) 282: 127. doi:10.1007/s00404-009-1213-y

Abstract

Purpose

We sought to evaluate the impact of obesity on the risk of spontaneous and medically indicated preterm birth in young women compared to adult women.

Methods

Florida vital records from 2004 to 2007 were used to obtain data. The study sample consisted of 290,807 mothers of whom 4,739 were adolescent girls ≤15 years old: 23,228 were girls 16–17 years old; 58,196 were women 18–19 years old; and 204,644 were women 20–24 years old. Adjusted estimates for spontaneous and medically indicated preterm birth were determined based on maternal BMI and weight gain during pregnancy. Subjects were categorized by BMI as follows: class I obesity (30.0 ≤ BMI ≤ 34.9), class II obesity (35.0 ≤ BMI ≤ 39.9), class III obesity (40 ≤ BMI ≤ 49.9), and super-obese (BMI ≥ 50.0).

Results

Obese mothers had elevated risk for medically indicated preterm birth and lower risk for spontaneous preterm birth compared to non-obese mothers. Overall, the risk for spontaneous preterm birth increased in a dose-dependent fashion with younger age but no age-dependent trend was observed for medically indicated preterm birth (P < 0.0001). Very low weight gain (<0.12 kg/week) during pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of spontaneous preterm birth among both non-obese and obese teenagers.

Conclusions

Preterm birth is a heterogeneous entity that is mediated by obesity status and maternal age. Obesity among pregnant teenagers increases the risk for medically indicated preterm birth but not the risk for spontaneous preterm birth.

Keywords

Adolescent pregnancy Obesity Preterm birth 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hamisu M. Salihu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Sabrina Luke
    • 2
  • Amina P. Alio
    • 4
  • Aaron Deutsch
    • 5
  • Phillip J. Marty
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Research and Evaluation, The Lawton and Rhea Chiles Center for Healthy Mothers and BabiesUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Community and Family HealthUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  5. 5.Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA

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