Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery

, Volume 128, Issue 7, pp 731–734

Talar body fracture combined with bimalleolar fracture

  • Dionysios-Alexandros J. Verettas
  • Athanasios Ververidis
  • Georgios I. Drosos
  • Christos N. Chatzipapas
  • Konstantinos I. Kazakos
Trauma Surgery

DOI: 10.1007/s00402-007-0475-8

Cite this article as:
Verettas, DA.J., Ververidis, A., Drosos, G.I. et al. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg (2008) 128: 731. doi:10.1007/s00402-007-0475-8

Abstract

The incidence of talar fractures is relatively low affecting usually young patients, while recent epidemiological studies have shown that talar body fractures represent a significant proportion of the total number of talar fractures. Talar body fractures are usually high-energy injuries and often a combined talar neck and body fracture is noted. An association between talar body fractures and ankle fractures has also been recorded involving the medial or lateral malleolus. The only report of a talar fracture combined with a bimalleolar ankle fracture that was found in the literature is referred to a talar neck fracture. In this report, a combination of a talar body fracture and bimalleolar ankle fracture in a polytraumatised young patient is presented. This combined injury pattern seems to be very rare, since a similar case was not found in the literature. An open reduction and internal fixation of the talar body fracture as well as the bimalleolar fracture, followed by a prolonged non-weight bearing, led to a fracture healing with no evidence of osteonecrosis. Minimal osteoarthritic changes of the tibiotalar joint were noted at 3 years follow-up with satisfactory functional results.

Keywords

Talar fracture Talar body fracture Bimalleolar fracture Avascular necrosis Post-traumatic arthritis 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dionysios-Alexandros J. Verettas
    • 1
  • Athanasios Ververidis
    • 1
  • Georgios I. Drosos
    • 1
  • Christos N. Chatzipapas
    • 1
  • Konstantinos I. Kazakos
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical SchoolDemocritus University of Thrace, University General Hospital of AlexandroupolisAlexandroupolisGreece

Personalised recommendations