Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery

, Volume 128, Issue 2, pp 185–187

Sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis and mediastinitis. A case report and review of the literature

Authors

  • Dimitrios A. Mikroulis
    • Department of Cardiac and Thoracic SurgeryDemocritus University of Thrace
  • Dionyssios A. Verettas
    • Department of Orthopaedics and TraumaDemocritus University of Thrace, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis
    • Department of Orthopaedics and TraumaDemocritus University of Thrace, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis
  • Lukman A. Lawal
    • Department of Cardiac and Thoracic SurgeryDemocritus University of Thrace
  • Konstantinos J. Kazakos
    • Department of Orthopaedics and TraumaDemocritus University of Thrace, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis
  • Georgios J. Bougioukas
    • Department of Cardiac and Thoracic SurgeryDemocritus University of Thrace
Orthopaedic Surgery

DOI: 10.1007/s00402-006-0273-8

Cite this article as:
Mikroulis, D.A., Verettas, D.A., Xarchas, K.C. et al. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg (2008) 128: 185. doi:10.1007/s00402-006-0273-8

Abstract

Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint is rare. Its causes have been reported to include immuno-compromizing diseases, intravenous drug abuse, fractures of the clavicle or catheterization of the subclavian vein. We report a case of septic arthritis of the SCJ in a diabetic patient following periarticular injection of steroids in the ipsilateral shoulder, as this route of infection has not been documented, to our knowledge, in the literature to date. We review the literature regarding epidemiology and methods of surgical treatment that have been proposed, and present our own surgical experience. Bacterial infection should always be suspected in cases of SCJ arthritis. If surgery is required, it is important to remember that bony procedures leave vascular structures exposed, making their cover by myoplasty mandatory.

Keywords

Septic arthritisSternoclavicular joint

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006