Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 102, Issue 6, pp 621–626

Dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease

  • Carlyn K. Rosenberg
  • Thomas J. Cummings
  • Ann M. Saunders
  • Corinne Widico
  • Lauren M. McIntyre
  • Christine M. Hulette
Regular Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s004010100415

Cite this article as:
Rosenberg, C.K., Cummings, T.J., Saunders, A.M. et al. Acta Neuropathol (2001) 102: 621. doi:10.1007/s004010100415

Abstract.

To investigate similarities and differences between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), we undertook a demographic analysis of 277 patients from the Kathleen Price Bryan Brain Bank with an antemortem diagnosis of probable AD. Patients with additional, possibly confounding clinical and pathologic diagnoses such as infarcts, hematomas, neoplasms, and other neurodegenerative disorders, were excluded from the analysis. Neuropathologically, AD alone was present in 192 subjects (69%), and DLB was found in 85 subjects (31%). All of the DLB cases had neuropathologic evidence of AD sufficient to meet CERAD criteria for a diagnosis of definite AD plus nigral Lewy bodies. Gender, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, brain weight, age at death, duration of disease and Braak stage were compared between the two groups. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher's exact test for comparisons of categorical data and Student's t-test for comparison of means for continuous outcomes. The proportion of males and females was balanced in the combined AD and DLB populations. There was a highly statistically significant increased frequency of APOE 3/4 in males with DLB (P=0.007). We found higher brain weights in males with DLB versus males with AD (P=0.012). AD was more frequent in females and DLB was more frequent in males (P=0.019). Our findings with respect to age at death, duration of disease and Braak stage within diagnostic groups confirm previously reported findings. These data suggest that Lewy bodies are more common in males affected with dementia, especially those with the APOE 3/4 genotype.

Alzheimer's disease Apolipoprotein E Dementia with Lewy bodies

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlyn K. Rosenberg
    • 2
  • Thomas J. Cummings
    • 1
  • Ann M. Saunders
    • 2
  • Corinne Widico
    • 2
  • Lauren M. McIntyre
    • 2
  • Christine M. Hulette
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Box 3712, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USAUSA
  2. 2.Bryan Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, Box 2900, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USAUSA