Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 109, Issue 4, pp 387–392

Losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q are rare in pediatric oligodendrogliomas

Authors

  • Portia A. Kreiger
    • Department of Pathology, Abramson Research Center, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
  • Yoshifumi Okada
    • Department of Pathology, Cancer Center and Neurosurgical Service, Massachusetts General HospitalHarvard Medical School
  • Scott Simon
    • Department of Neurosurgery, The Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaUniversity of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
  • Lucy B. Rorke
    • Department of Pathology, Abramson Research Center, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
  • David N. Louis
    • Department of Pathology, Cancer Center and Neurosurgical Service, Massachusetts General HospitalHarvard Medical School
    • Department of Pathology, Abramson Research Center, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Regular Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00401-004-0976-2

Cite this article as:
Kreiger, P.A., Okada, Y., Simon, S. et al. Acta Neuropathol (2005) 109: 387. doi:10.1007/s00401-004-0976-2

Abstract

Pediatric oligodendrogliomas are rare neoplasms and have not been characterized extensively either pathologically or genetically. Given the recent interest in the significance of chromosomal losses in predicting the clinical course and in establishing uniform diagnoses of adult oligodendrogliomas, we reviewed the pathological and clinical features of a series of pediatric oligodendrogliomas and determined their 1p and 19q status using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of 19 tumors originally diagnosed as oligodendroglioma, 7 were oligodendroglioma, 3 were anaplastic oligodendroglioma, 3 were oligoastrocytoma, and 6 were reclassified. Only one tumor, an anaplastic oligodendroglioma, had 1p loss; none had 19q loss. The single patient whose tumor had 1p loss did not have a particularly favorable clinical course. These results suggest that pediatric oligodendrogliomas arise by molecular alterations distinct from adult oligodendrogliomas, and such molecular alterations do not hold immediate promise as an adjunct to the diagnosis of pediatric oligodendrogliomas.

Keywords

Chromosome 1pChromosome 19qFluorescence in situ hybridizationOligodendrogliomaPediatric

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005