Colloid and Polymer Science

, Volume 290, Issue 5, pp 385–400

Aggregation behavior of thermo-responsive poly(2-oxazoline)s at the cloud point investigated by FCS and SANS

  • Stephan Salzinger
  • Stephan Huber
  • Sebastian Jaksch
  • Peter Busch
  • Rainer Jordan
  • Christine M. Papadakis
Original Contribution

DOI: 10.1007/s00396-011-2564-z

Cite this article as:
Salzinger, S., Huber, S., Jaksch, S. et al. Colloid Polym Sci (2012) 290: 385. doi:10.1007/s00396-011-2564-z

Abstract

We have studied different thermo-responsive poly(2-oxazoline)s with iso-propyl (iPrOx) and n-propyl (nPrOx) pendant groups in aqueous solutions, where they exhibit lower critical solution temperature behavior. This paper focuses on the effect of the degree of polymerization, n, the concentration, c, in the dilute regime, and the presence of hydrophobic moieties. The cloud points were investigated as a function of the degree of polymerization, n, and of the polymer concentration, c. The aggregation behavior near the cloud point was studied by temperature-resolved small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, i.e., a combination of ensemble and single molecule methods. We found that at the cloud points, large aggregates are formed and that the cloud points depend strongly on both, n and c. Diblock copolymers from iPrOx and nPrOx form large aggregates already at the cloud point of PnPrOx, and, unexpectedly, no micelles are observed between the cloud points of the two blocks. Gradient copolymers from iPrOx and n-nonyl-2-oxazoline (NOx) display a complex aggregation behavior resulting from the interplay between intra- and intermolecular association mediated by the hydrophobic NOx blocks. Above the cloud point, an intermediate temperature regime with a width of a few Kelvin was found with small but stable polymer aggregates. Only at higher temperatures, larger aggregates are found in significant number.

Keywords

PolyoxazolineCloud pointThermo-responsive polymersSmall-angle neutron scatteringFluorescence correlation spectroscopy

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephan Salzinger
    • 1
  • Stephan Huber
    • 1
  • Sebastian Jaksch
    • 2
  • Peter Busch
    • 3
  • Rainer Jordan
    • 1
    • 4
  • Christine M. Papadakis
    • 2
  1. 1.Technische Universität München, Department ChemieWACKER-Lehrstuhl für Makromolekulare ChemieGarchingGermany
  2. 2.Technische Universität München, PhysikdepartmentFachgebiet Physik weicher MaterieGarchingGermany
  3. 3.Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbHJülich Centre for Neutron Science at FRM IIGarchingGermany
  4. 4.Department Chemie, Professur für Makromolekulare ChemieTechnische Universität DresdenDresdenGermany