European Journal of Nutrition

, Volume 52, Issue 3, pp 949–961

Effect of a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) drink intervention on markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial function in humans with cardiovascular risk factors

  • Patrizia Riso
  • Dorothy Klimis-Zacas
  • Cristian Del Bo’
  • Daniela Martini
  • Jonica Campolo
  • Stefano Vendrame
  • Peter Møller
  • Steffen Loft
  • Renata De Maria
  • Marisa Porrini
Original Contribution

DOI: 10.1007/s00394-012-0402-9

Cite this article as:
Riso, P., Klimis-Zacas, D., Del Bo’, C. et al. Eur J Nutr (2013) 52: 949. doi:10.1007/s00394-012-0402-9

Abstract

Purpose

Wild blueberries (WB) (Vaccinium angustifolium) are rich sources of polyphenols, such as flavonols, phenolic acids and anthocyanins (ACNs), reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular and degenerative diseases. This study investigated the effect of regular consumption of a WB or a placebo (PL) drink on markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial function in subjects with risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Methods

Eighteen male volunteers (ages 47.8 ± 9.7 years; body mass index 24.8 ± 2.6 kg/m2) received according to a cross-over design, a WB (25 g freeze-dried powder, providing 375 mg of ACNs) or a PL drink for 6 weeks, spaced by a 6-week wash-out. Endogenous and oxidatively induced DNA damage in blood mononuclear cells, serum interleukin levels, reactive hyperemia index, nitric oxide, soluble vascular adhesion molecule concentration and other variables were analyzed.

Results

Wild blueberry drink intake significantly reduced the levels of endogenously oxidized DNA bases (from 12.5 ± 5.6 % to 9.6 ± 3.5 %, p ≤ 0.01) and the levels of H2O2-induced DNA damage (from 45.8 ± 7.9 % to 37.2 ± 9.1 %, p ≤ 0.01), while no effect was found after the PL drink. No significant differences were detected for markers of endothelial function and the other variables under study.

Conclusions

In conclusion, the consumption of the WB drink for 6 weeks significantly reduced the levels of oxidized DNA bases and increased the resistance to oxidatively induced DNA damage. Future studies should address in greater detail the role of WB in endothelial function. This study was registered at www.isrctn.org as ISRCTN47732406.

Keywords

Wild blueberryEndothelial functionDNA damageBlood lipidsCardiovascular risk

Abbreviations

AACC

American Association for Clinical Chemistry

ACNs

Anthocyanins

AI

Augmentation index

AI@75

Augmentation index standardized for heart rate of 75 bpm

ANOVA

Analysis of variance

AOAC

Association of Official Analytical Chemists

ALT

Alanine aminotransferase

AST

Aspartate aminotransferase

BMI

Body mass index

CI

Confidence interval

CRP

C-reactive protein

CVD

Cardiovascular disease

FMD

Flow-mediated dilation

FPG

Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase

FRHI

Framingham reactive hyperemia index

GGT

Gamma-glutamyltransferase

GSH

Reduced glutathione

GSH-Px

Glutathione peroxidase

GSSG

Oxidized glutathione

GST

Glutathione S-transferase

HDL-C

High-density lipoprotein cholesterol

HPLC

High-performance liquid chromatography

IL-6

Interleukin-6

LC-DAD-MS/MS

Liquid chromatography/diode array detector/mass spectrometry

LDL-C

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

LSD

Least significant difference

BMCs

Blood mononuclear cells

NO

Nitric oxide

PAT

Peripheral arterial tone

PBS

Phosphate-buffered saline

PL

Placebo

RH

Reactive hyperemia

RHI

Reactive hyperemia index

SD

Standard deviation

SOD

Superoxide dismutase

SPE

Solid-phase extraction

sVCAM-1

Soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1

TNF-α

Tumor necrosis factor alpha

TFA

Trifluoroacetic acid

TG

Triglycerides

TSC

Total serum cholesterol

UHPLC-MS/MS

Ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

WB

Wild blueberry

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrizia Riso
    • 1
  • Dorothy Klimis-Zacas
    • 2
  • Cristian Del Bo’
    • 1
  • Daniela Martini
    • 1
  • Jonica Campolo
    • 3
  • Stefano Vendrame
    • 2
  • Peter Møller
    • 4
  • Steffen Loft
    • 4
  • Renata De Maria
    • 3
  • Marisa Porrini
    • 1
  1. 1.DeFENS, Department of Food, Environmental and Nutritional SciencesUniversità degli Studi di MilanoMilanItaly
  2. 2.Department of Food Science and Human NutritionUniversity of MaineOronoUSA
  3. 3.Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica CNROspedale Niguarda Ca’ GrandaMilanItaly
  4. 4.Department of Public Health, Section of Environmental HealthUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark