Clinical Research in Cardiology

, Volume 102, Issue 6, pp 413–425

First in vitro and in vivo results of an anti-human CD133-antibody coated coronary stent in the porcine model

  • Alexander Sedaghat
  • Jan-Malte Sinning
  • Kathrin Paul
  • Gregor Kirfel
  • Georg Nickenig
  • Nikos Werner
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00392-013-0547-4

Cite this article as:
Sedaghat, A., Sinning, JM., Paul, K. et al. Clin Res Cardiol (2013) 102: 413. doi:10.1007/s00392-013-0547-4

Abstract

Background

Drug-eluting stents successfully reduce restenosis at the cost of delayed re-endothelialization. A novel concept to enhance re-endothelialization is the use of antibody-coated stents which capture circulating progenitor cells. A CD34-positive-cell-capturing stent was recently developed with conflicting clinical results. CD133 is a glycoprotein expressed on circulating hematopoietic and putative endothelial-regenerating cells and may be superior to CD34.

Objective

The aim of our study was to develop a CD133-cell-capturing bare-metal stent and investigate feasibility, safety, and efficacy of CD133-stents in terms of re-endothelialization and neointima inhibition.

Methods and results

Anti-human CD133-antibodies were covalently attached to bare-metal stents. In vitro, binding capacity of CD133-stents was studied, revealing a significantly higher affinity of human CD133-positive cells to CD133-stents compared with mononuclear cells (MNCs). In vivo, 15 landrace pigs received BMS and CD133-stents in either RCX or LAD (n = 30 stents). Re-endothelialization was examined on day 1 (n = 4), 3 (n = 4) and day 7 (n = 4) using scanning electron microscopy. In histology, injury and inflammatory scores, as well as diameter restenosis were evaluated after day 7 (n = 3), 14 (n = 4), and 28 (n = 2). Overall no reduction in re-endothelialization, diameter stenosis or inflammatory score was seen with CD133-stents.

Conclusion

Stent coating with anti-human CD133-antibodies was successfully achieved with effective binding of CD133-positive cells. However, in vivo, no difference in re-endothelialization or neointima formation was evident with the use of CD133-stents compared with BMS. The low number of circulating CD133-positive cells and an increase in unspecific binding of MNCs over time may account for the observed lack of efficacy.

Keywords

Endothelial progenitor cellsCD133RestenosisNeointima

Abbreviations

BMS

Bare metal stent

EC

Endothelial cells

EPC

Endothelial progenitor cells

ISR

Instent restenosis

(L)ST

(Late) Stent thrombosis

MNC

Mononuclear cells

SEM

Scanning electron microscopy

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Sedaghat
    • 1
  • Jan-Malte Sinning
    • 1
  • Kathrin Paul
    • 1
  • Gregor Kirfel
    • 2
  • Georg Nickenig
    • 1
  • Nikos Werner
    • 1
  1. 1.Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik IIUniversitätsklinikum Bonn, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität BonnBonnGermany
  2. 2.Institut für ZellbiologieRheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität BonnBonnGermany