Clinical Research in Cardiology

, Volume 102, Issue 4, pp 269–278

Generic and disease-specific health-related quality of life in patients with chronic systolic heart failure: impact of depression

Authors

    • Department of Medical Psychology, Medical Sociology and Rehabilitation SciencesUniversity of Würzburg
  • Götz Gelbrich
    • Coordination Center for Clinical TrialsUniversity of Leipzig
    • Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and BiometryUniversity of Würzburg
  • Stefan Störk
    • Department of Internal Medicine I/Center of Cardiovascular MedicineUniversity Hospital Würzburg
  • Jan-Philip Langguth
    • Department of Internal Medicine I/Center of Cardiovascular MedicineUniversity Hospital Würzburg
  • Caroline Morbach
    • Department of Internal Medicine I/Center of Cardiovascular MedicineUniversity Hospital Würzburg
  • Georg Ertl
    • Department of Internal Medicine I/Center of Cardiovascular MedicineUniversity Hospital Würzburg
  • Hermann Faller
    • Department of Medical Psychology, Medical Sociology and Rehabilitation SciencesUniversity of Würzburg
  • Christiane E. Angermann
    • Department of Internal Medicine I/Center of Cardiovascular MedicineUniversity Hospital Würzburg
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00392-012-0531-4

Cite this article as:
Schowalter, M., Gelbrich, G., Störk, S. et al. Clin Res Cardiol (2013) 102: 269. doi:10.1007/s00392-012-0531-4

Abstract

Aims

Heart failure is known to profoundly affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We aimed to describe both generic and disease-specific HRQoL in a large community-based sample of patients with systolic heart failure (SHF) and to identify important somatic and psychosocial correlates.

Methods and results

Seven hundred and two patients, 67 ± 12 years old, 71 % men, with distributions of New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classes I/II/III/IV of 2/55/39/4 % were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Generic HRQoL was measured with the SF-36 health survey, disease-specific HRQoL with the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire, and depression with the self-reported Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Both generic- and disease-specific HRQoL measurements indicated moderate to poor HRQoL. The KCCQ scores demonstrated higher sensitivity to the varying levels of heart failure severity as compared to the SF-36 scores. Patients with either a minor (15 %) or a major depression (24 %) reported significantly and substantially lower HRQoL (p < .001) than patients without depression did. In multivariable regression analyses, depression accounted for the largest part of the variance of both generic and specific HRQoL (12 and 36 %, respectively), whereas most biomedical variables had no or only a marginal influence.

Conclusion

Patients with SHF suffer from severe limitations of HRQoL. Depression was the most important correlate of both generic and disease-specific HRQoL.

Keywords

Chronic heart failureGeneric health-related quality of lifeDisease-specific health-related quality of lifeDepression

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012