, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 41-46

Transepithelial transport processes at the intestinal mucosa in inflammatory bowel disease

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Abstract

Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) of unknown etiology. Oral absorption studies have shown an increased intestinal permeability for various sugar molecules in patients with IBD and their healthy relatives as a possible pathogenetic factor. However, the various transport pathways through the mucosal barrier have not yet been examined. This study therefore investigated whether antigens pass the epithelial barrier by a transcellular or a paracellular pathway. Mucosa of freshly resected specimens from CD (n = 10) or UC (n = 10) patients was investigated by immunoelectron microscopy and compared with healthy mucosa. Epithelial transport was studied with the antigens ovalbumin and horseradish peroxidase after defined incubation. Labeling density of subunit c of ATP synthetase was determined in mitochondria of enterocytes of all specimens. In all specimens epithelial transport of OVA and HRP was principally transcellular through enterocytes with normal ultrastructure, although some tight junctions in CD and UC were dilated. Antigens were transported within vesicles to the basolateral membrane 2.5 min after incubation. The level of enterocytes with electron-lucent cytoplasm containing a high amount of antigens was higher in CD and UC than in healthy mucosa, depending on the grade of inflammation. ATP synthetase was significantly decreased in electron-lucent cytoplasm of CD and UC to normal ultrastructure of healthy mucosa. Our study shows that ovalbumin and horseradish peroxidase taken up by the apical membrane reach the paracellular space by vesicular transport in healthy and IBD enterocytes within a few minutes. Transcellular pathway is affected in both CD and UC, which is indicated by a high level of antigens within the cytosol. We speculate that increased intestinal permeability in IBD results substantially from enhanced transcellular transport.

Accepted: 4 January 1999