Pediatric Surgery International

, Volume 20, Issue 5, pp 372–375

Clinical manifestations of appendiceal pinworms in children: an institutional experience and a review of the literature

  • Marjorie J. Arca
  • Robert L. Gates
  • Jonathan I. Groner
  • Sue Hammond
  • Donna A. Caniano
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00383-004-1151-5

Cite this article as:
Arca, M.J., Gates, R.L., Groner, J.I. et al. Ped Surgery Int (2004) 20: 372. doi:10.1007/s00383-004-1151-5

Abstract

The association of Enterobius vermicularis infestation with acute appendicitis varies from 0.2–41.8% worldwide. Our purpose was to determine the significance of Enterobius-associated appendicitis by retrospective review of appendectomies performed during a 5-year period at a major children’s hospital. The Surgical Pathology database at Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, was reviewed for appendiceal specimens found to have Enterobius infestation. Corresponding patient charts were evaluated for age, gender, presenting symptoms, laboratory data, operative findings, and clinical course. Of the 1,549 appendectomies performed from January 1998 through January 2003, 21 specimens (1.4%) were found to contain Enterobius vermicularis. Fifteen of the appendectomies were performed for symptoms of acute appendicitis; the remaining six were incidental appendectomies in conjunction with other operations. The mean age was 8.9 years. Ten patients were male; 11 were female. Of the 15 symptomatic children, nine presented with fever >99.0ºF, and 11 had a WBC count >10,000. Intra-operative appearance of the appendix ranged from normal to perforation. Pathologic evaluation showed neutrophil or eosinophil infiltration in 15 of the 21 specimens. Enterobius infestation is an uncommon cause of acute appendicitis in children in the United States. It may be associated with acute appendicitis, “chronic appendicitis,” ruptured appendicitis, or with no significant clinical symptoms.

Keywords

Enterobius vermicularis Pinworms Appendicitis Oxyuriasis 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marjorie J. Arca
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert L. Gates
    • 2
  • Jonathan I. Groner
    • 2
  • Sue Hammond
    • 3
  • Donna A. Caniano
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric SurgeryChildren’s Hospital of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pediatric SurgeryChildren’s Hospital and The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  3. 3.Division of Anatomic PathologyChildren’s Hospital and The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA