Climate Dynamics

, Volume 42, Issue 5, pp 1509–1516

El Niño Modoki connection to extremely-low streamflow of the Paranaíba River in Brazil

  • Netrananda Sahu
  • Swadhin K. Behera
  • J. V. Ratnam
  • Roberto Valmir Da Silva
  • Pradipta Parhi
  • Weili Duan
  • Kaoru Takara
  • R. B. Singh
  • Toshio Yamagata
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00382-013-2006-3

Cite this article as:
Sahu, N., Behera, S.K., Ratnam, J.V. et al. Clim Dyn (2014) 42: 1509. doi:10.1007/s00382-013-2006-3

Abstract

Extremely-low discharge events of the Paranaíba River basin during the austral summer season (December–February, DJF), are found to be associated with the Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies resembling the recently identified El Niño Modoki phenomenon. Extreme discharge events are identified based on their persistent flow for 7 days and more after taking retention time into consideration. Ninety percent of the extremely low discharge events during peak streamflow seasons of DJF, are found to occur during the El Niño Modoki years. A diagnostics study of atmospheric anomalies has shown a clear connection between the modified Walker circulation, associated with the El Niño Modoki, and the precipitation anomalies over the Paranaíba River basin. The climate variations have direct relationship with the rainfall. Streamflow variations are considered as the surrogates to rainfalls. Thus, El Niño Modoki phase is important component to understand and predict the streamflow variations in the Paranaíba River basin.

Keywords

El Niño Modoki ENSO Climate variability Streamflow Extreme discharge events Paranaíba River 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Netrananda Sahu
    • 1
  • Swadhin K. Behera
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. V. Ratnam
    • 2
    • 3
  • Roberto Valmir Da Silva
    • 4
  • Pradipta Parhi
    • 5
  • Weili Duan
    • 1
  • Kaoru Takara
    • 1
  • R. B. Singh
    • 6
  • Toshio Yamagata
    • 3
  1. 1.Disaster Prevention Research Institute (DPRI)Kyoto UniversityGokasho, UjiJapan
  2. 2.Research Institute for Global ChangeJAMSTECYokohamaJapan
  3. 3.Application LaboratoryJAMSTECYokohamaJapan
  4. 4.Environmental EngineeringFederal University of Fronteira SulErechimBrazil
  5. 5.Earth and Environmental EngineeringColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Department of Geography, Delhi School of EconomicsUniversity of DelhiDelhiIndia