Child's Nervous System

, Volume 26, Issue 7, pp 913–917

Energy expenditure in obesity associated with craniopharyngioma

  • Roy J. Kim
  • Rachana Shah
  • Andy M. Tershakovec
  • Babette S. Zemel
  • Leslie N. Sutton
  • Adda Grimberg
  • Thomas Moshang
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00381-009-1078-1

Cite this article as:
Kim, R.J., Shah, R., Tershakovec, A.M. et al. Childs Nerv Syst (2010) 26: 913. doi:10.1007/s00381-009-1078-1

Abstract

Background and purpose

Obesity is a common yet incompletely understood complication of childhood craniopharyngioma. We hypothesized that craniopharyngioma is associated with specific defects in energy balance compared to obese control children.

Methods

Eleven craniopharyngioma patients were recruited for a study on body composition and energy balance. Eight subjects were obese. The obese craniopharyngioma patients had a mean age (±SD) of 11.2 ± 1.7 years. The average body mass index z score was 2.33 (±0.32). A previously studied group of obese children (BMI z score 2.46 ± 0.46) served as controls. Resting energy expenditure (REE) was determined by indirect calorimetry and body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in all children.

Results

Obese craniopharyngioma patient subjects had increased mean (±standard error) fat-free mass compared to obese controls (57% ± 0.88 % vs 50.0% ± 0.87%, p = 0.02). The obese craniopharyngioma patients had a 17% lower REE compared to values expected from the World Health Organization equation (1,541 ± 112.6 vs 1,809 ± 151.8 kcal; p = 0.01). In contrast, the obese control children had measured REE within 1% of predicted (1,647 ± 33.2 vs. 1,652 ± 40.2; p = 0.8). In a linear regression model, REE remained significantly lower than predicted after controlling for FFM.

Conclusions

Lower REE may be a factor contributing to obesity in children with craniopharyngioma. Further study is needed into the mechanisms for reduced energy expenditure in patients with craniopharyngioma.

Keywords

Obesity Craniopharyngioma Energy expenditure Hypothalamic obesity 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy J. Kim
    • 1
  • Rachana Shah
    • 1
  • Andy M. Tershakovec
    • 2
  • Babette S. Zemel
    • 3
  • Leslie N. Sutton
    • 4
  • Adda Grimberg
    • 1
  • Thomas Moshang
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of EndocrinologyChildren’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Merck & Co., Inc.North WalesUSA
  3. 3.Division of Gastroenterology and NutritionChildren’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Division of NeurosurgeryChildren’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA

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