Child's Nervous System

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 211–220

Astroblastoma in childhood: pathological and clinical analysis

  • Ramon Navarro
  • Aaron J. Reitman
  • Guillermo A. de León
  • Stewart Goldman
  • Maryanne Marymont
  • Tadanori Tomita
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00381-004-1055-7

Cite this article as:
Navarro, R., Reitman, A.J., de León, G.A. et al. Childs Nerv Syst (2005) 21: 211. doi:10.1007/s00381-004-1055-7

Abstract

Object

The object was to describe the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of astroblastomas in an unselected group of children who were treated in a single institution during an 11-year period.

Methods

Eight children with astroblastomas of the brain were examined. Diagnosis was based on cell morphology, vascular attachment of the cell main process, lack of an epithelial-free surface differentiation, and poor intercellular cohesiveness. In addition to sections, tumor smears and electron microscopy were required for demonstrating or confirming such features.

Conclusions

Clinical findings seem to confirm an apparent predilection of astroblastomas for younger children (median age of onset, 5 years) and the existence of two prognostically different types of tumor—well differentiated (low grade) and anaplastic (high grade). Microscopic findings suggest a closer resemblance of tumor cells to astroblasts rather than to “tanycytes” or ependymal cells. It seems, however, that anaplastic astroblasts have a tendency to evolve toward, or be associated with, less differentiated cells, either neuroepithelial or sarcomatous.

Keywords

AstroblastAstroblastomaEpendymomaGliomyosarcomaMedullo-epitheliomaTanycyte

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ramon Navarro
    • 1
  • Aaron J. Reitman
    • 1
  • Guillermo A. de León
    • 2
  • Stewart Goldman
    • 3
  • Maryanne Marymont
    • 4
  • Tadanori Tomita
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Falk Brain Tumor Center, Children’s Memorial HospitalNorthwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Division of Anatomic Pathology, Falk Brain Tumor Center, Children’s Memorial HospitalNorthwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Falk Brain Tumor Center, Children’s Memorial HospitalNorthwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  4. 4.Department of Radiation Oncology, Falk Brain Tumor Center, Children’s Memorial HospitalNorthwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA