Advances in Atmospheric Sciences

, Volume 18, Issue 6, pp 1121–1130

Comparison of field measurements of CH4 emission from rice cultivation in Nanjing, China and in Texas, Usa

Authors

    • Institute of Atmospheric PhysicsChinese Academy of Sciences
    • College of Resources and Environmental SciencesNanjing Agricultural University
  • Jiang Jingyan
    • College of Resources and Environmental SciencesNanjing Agricultural University
  • Zong Lianggang
    • College of Resources and Environmental SciencesNanjing Agricultural University
  • Ronald L. Sass
    • Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyRice University
  • Frank M. Fisher
    • Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyRice University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00376-001-0027-z

Cite this article as:
Yao, H., Jingyan, J., Lianggang, Z. et al. Adv. Atmos. Sci. (2001) 18: 1121. doi:10.1007/s00376-001-0027-z

Abstract

Field measurements of methane emission from rice paddies were made in Nanjing, China and in Texas, USA, respectively. Soil temperature at approximately 10 cm depth of the flooded soils was automatically recorded. Aboveground biomass of rice crop was measured approximately every 10 days in Nanjing and every other week in Texas. Seasonal variation of soil temperature in Nanjing was quite wide with a magnitude of 15.3°C and that in Texas was narrow with a magnitude of 2.9°C. Analysis of methane emission fluxes against soil temperature and rice biomass production demonstrated that the seasonal course of methane emission in Nanjing was mostly attributed to soil temperature changes, while that in Texas was mainly related to rice biomass production. We concluded that under the permanent flooding condition, the seasonal trend of methane emission would be determined by the soil temperature where there was a wide variation of soil temperature, and the seasonal trend would be mainly determined by rice biomass production if there are no additional organic matter inputs and the variation of soil temperature over the rice growing season is small.

Key words

CH4 emissionRice paddiesRice biomass productionSoil temperature

Copyright information

© Advances in Atmospheric Sciences 2001