Biology and Fertility of Soils

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 348–353

Influence of nitrogen on atrazine and 2, 4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid mineralization in blackwater and redwater forested wetland soils

  • J. A. Entry
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s003740050564

Cite this article as:
Entry, J. Biol Fertil Soils (1999) 29: 348. doi:10.1007/s003740050564

Abstract

 Microcosms were used to determine the influence of N additions on active bacterial and fungal biomass, atrazine and dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) mineralization at 5, 10 and 15 weeks in soils from blackwater and redwater wetland forest ecosystems in the northern Florida Panhandle. Active bacterial and fungal biomass was determined by staining techniques combined with direct microscopy. Atrazine and 2,4-D mineralization were measured radiometrically. Treatments were: soil type, (blackwater or redwater forested wetland soils) and N additions (soils amended with the equivalent of 0, 200 or 400 kg N ha–1 as NH4NO3). Redwater soils contained higher concentrations of C, total N, P, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, B and Zn than blackwater soils. After N addition and 15 weeks of incubation, active bacterial biomass in redwater soils was lower when N was added. Active bacterial biomass in blackwater soils was lower when 400 kg N ha–1, but not when 200 kg N ha–1, was added. Active fungal biomass in blackwater soils was higher when 400 kg N ha–1, but not when 200 kg N ha–1, was added. Active fungal biomass in redwater soils was lower when 200 kg N ha–1, but not when 400 kg N ha–1, was added. After 15 weeks of incubation 2,4-D degradation was higher in redwater wetland soils than in blackwater soils. After 10 and 15 weeks of incubation the addition of 200 or 400 kg N ha–1 decreased both atrazine and 2,4-D degradation in redwater soils. The addition of 400 kg N ha–1 decreased 2,4-D degradation but not atrazine degradation in blackwater soils after 10 and 15 weeks of incubation. High concentrations of N in surface runoff and groundwater resulting from agricultural operations may have resulted in the accumulation of N in many wetland soils. Large amounts of N accumulating in wetlands may decrease mineralization of toxic agricultural pesticides.

Key words WetlandsBlackwaterRedwaterAtrazine24-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Entry
    • 1
  1. 1.USDA Agricultural Research Service, Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research Laboratory, 3793 North, 3600 East, Kimberly, ID 83341, USA e-mail jentry@kimberly.ars.pn.usbr.gov Tel.: +1-208-4236553 Fax: +1-208-4236555US