Biology and Fertility of Soils

, Volume 42, Issue 4, pp 286–298

Species composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in two mountain meadows with differing management types and levels of plant biodiversity

  • Boris Börstler
  • Carsten Renker
  • Ansgar Kahmen
  • François Buscot
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00374-005-0026-9

Cite this article as:
Börstler, B., Renker, C., Kahmen, A. et al. Biol Fertil Soils (2006) 42: 286. doi:10.1007/s00374-005-0026-9
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Abstract

Species composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was analysed in two differently managed mountain grasslands in Thuringia (Germany). Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were studied in the roots of 18 dominant plant species from a total of 56 (32%). Additionally, spores of AMF were isolated from soil samples. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species composition was analysed based on 96 sequences of the internal transcribed spacer of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, 72 originated from mycorrhizal roots, and 24 originated from AMF spores. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a total of 19 AMF species representing all genera of the Glomeromycota except Scutellospora and Pacispora. Despite a different farming intensity, resulting in remarkable differences concerning their plant species diversity (27 against 43 plant species), the diversity of AMF was found to be similar with 11 species on the intensively farmed meadow and ten species on the extensively farmed one. Nevertheless, species composition between both sites was clearly different. It thus seems likely that the AMF species composition, but not necessarily the species number, is related to above ground plant biodiversity in the system under study.

Keywords

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungiFarming intensityInternal transcribed spacerPlant species diversitySpecies composition

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Boris Börstler
    • 1
  • Carsten Renker
    • 1
  • Ansgar Kahmen
    • 2
  • François Buscot
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Botany, Terrestrial EcologyUniversity of LeipzigLeipzigGermany
  2. 2.Max Planck Institute for BiogeochemistryJenaGermany