Journal of Comparative Physiology A

, Volume 183, Issue 1, pp 7–21

Mobilities of the cercal wind-receptor hairs of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus

Authors

  • T. Kumagai
    • Neuro-Cybernetics Laboratory, Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060 Japan, Fax: +81-11-706-4971 e-mail: tateo@ncp8.es.hokudai.ac.jp
  • T. Shimozawa
    • Neuro-Cybernetics Laboratory, Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060 Japan, Fax: +81-11-706-4971 e-mail: tateo@ncp8.es.hokudai.ac.jp
  • Y. Baba
    • Neuro-Cybernetics Laboratory, Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060 Japan, Fax: +81-11-706-4971 e-mail: tateo@ncp8.es.hokudai.ac.jp
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s003590050230

Cite this article as:
Kumagai, T., Shimozawa, T. & Baba, Y. J Comp Physiol A (1998) 183: 7. doi:10.1007/s003590050230

Abstract

The deflection sensitivities of cercal filiform hairs of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, were determined by direct measurement. The tangential velocity of deflecting hair shafts in response to stimulus air motion was measured in situ by a laser-Doppler velocimeter with surface scattering of the shaft. The velocity of the stimulus air motion in a small wind tunnel was calibrated by the same velocimeter with smoke from a joss-stick. The mobility of the hair was obtained from former measurements with reference to the latter calibration of the single apparatus. A Gaussian white noise signal was employed as a stimulus waveform, and the stimulus-response transfer function was calculated through a cross-correlation method, which provides greater precision and wider frequency for a longer period of measurement. The mobility of hair was expressed in deflection amplitudes and phase shifts in reference to the velocity sinusoid of a stimulus at various frequencies. The measurements established the following conclusions. The wind receptor hairs comprise an array of mechanical band-pass filters whose best frequencies are inversely proportional to the length. The motion dynamics of the wind-receptor hairs have strong damping.

Key words CricketWind-receptor hairSize variationMechanical band-pass filterFrequency-range fractionation
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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998