Journal of Comparative Physiology A

, Volume 200, Issue 6, pp 591–601

Multiple sources of celestial compass information in the Central Australian desert ant Melophorus bagoti

  • Antoine Wystrach
  • Sebastian Schwarz
  • Patrick Schultheiss
  • Alice Baniel
  • Ken Cheng
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00359-014-0899-x

Cite this article as:
Wystrach, A., Schwarz, S., Schultheiss, P. et al. J Comp Physiol A (2014) 200: 591. doi:10.1007/s00359-014-0899-x

Abstract

The Central Australian desert ant Melophorus bagoti is known to use celestial cues for compass orientation. We manipulated the available celestial cues for compass orientation for ants that had arrived at a feeder, were captured and then released at a distant test site that had no useful terrestrial panoramic cues. When tested in an enclosed transparent box that blocked some or most of the ultraviolet light, the ants were still well oriented homewards. The ants were again significantly oriented homewards when most of the ultraviolet light as well as the sun was blocked, or when the box was covered with tracing paper that eliminated the pattern of polarised light, although in the latter case, their headings were more scattered than in control (full-cue) conditions. When the position of the sun was reflected 180° by a mirror, the ants headed off in an intermediate direction between the dictates of the sun and the dictates of unrotated cues. We conclude that M. bagoti uses all available celestial compass cues, including the pattern of polarised light, the position of the sun, and spectral and intensity gradients. They average multiple cues in a weighted fashion when these cues conflict.

Keywords

Desert antCompassPolarised lightUltravioletNavigation

Supplementary material

359_2014_899_MOESM1_ESM.doc (32 kb)
Supplemental Fig. 1. The distribution of ants’ headings in the high UV-blocking box (left) and in the high UV-blocking box with a portion of the sky not containing the sun mirrored (right). The red arrows show the mean vector, with the rim of the circles indicating a vector length of 1. The centre of the small open circles indicate the 95 % confidence intervals about the mean direction. The black triangle indicates the feeder-nest direction. The numbers outside the histograms indicate the number of ants represented by a bar reaching the rim of the circle. The numbers inside the histograms (n’s) indicate the number of ants tested in each condition (DOC 32 kb)
359_2014_899_MOESM2_ESM.eps (229 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (EPS 229 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antoine Wystrach
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sebastian Schwarz
    • 1
    • 3
  • Patrick Schultheiss
    • 1
  • Alice Baniel
    • 1
  • Ken Cheng
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesMacquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.School of Life SciencesUniversity of SussexBrightonUK
  3. 3.Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and BehaviourMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada