Journal of Comparative Physiology A

, Volume 187, Issue 12, pp 997–1007

Depth generalization from stereo to motion parallax in the owl

  • Robert F. van der Willigen
  • Barrie J. Frost
  • Hermann Wagner
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00359-001-0271-9

Cite this article as:
van der Willigen, R.F., Frost, B.J. & Wagner, H. J Comp Physiol A (2002) 187: 997. doi:10.1007/s00359-001-0271-9

Abstract.

Although many sources of three-dimensional information have been isolated and demonstrated to contribute independently to depth vision in animal studies, it is not clear whether these distinct cues are perceived to be perceptually equivalent. Such ability is observed in humans and would seem to be advantageous for animals as well in coping with the often co-varying (or ambiguous) information about the layout of physical space. We introduce the expression primary-depth-cue equivalence to refer to the ability to perceive mutually consistent information about differences in depth from either stereopsis or motion-parallax. We found that owls trained to detect relative depth as a perceptual category (objects versus holes) when specified by binocular disparity alone (stereopsis), immediately transferred this discrimination to novel stimuli where the equivalent depth categories were available only through differences in motion information produced by head movements (observer-produced motion-parallax). Motion-parallax discrimination did occur under monocular viewing conditions and reliable performance depended heavily on the amplitude of side-to-side head movements. The presence of primary-depth-cue equivalence in the visual system of the owl provides further conformation of the hypothesis that neural systems evolved to detect differences in either disparity or motion information are likely to share similar processing mechanisms.

Depth vision Discrimination-transfer Stereopsis Motion-parallax Animal psychophysics

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. van der Willigen
    • 1
  • Barrie J. Frost
    • 1
  • Hermann Wagner
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Biologie II, RWTH Aachen, Kopernikusstrasse 16, 52074 Aachen, Germany
  2. 2.Present address: Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada