Applied Physics B

, Volume 67, Issue 4, pp 399–410

Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements from air and space

Authors

  • E.V. Browell
    • Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center, M.S. 401A, Hampton, Virginia, 23681, USA (Fax: +1-757/864-7790, E-mail: e.v.browell@larc.nasa.gov; s.ismail@larc.nasa.gov; w.b.grant@larc.nasa.gov)
  • S. Ismail
    • Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center, M.S. 401A, Hampton, Virginia, 23681, USA (Fax: +1-757/864-7790, E-mail: e.v.browell@larc.nasa.gov; s.ismail@larc.nasa.gov; w.b.grant@larc.nasa.gov)
  • W.B. Grant
    • Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center, M.S. 401A, Hampton, Virginia, 23681, USA (Fax: +1-757/864-7790, E-mail: e.v.browell@larc.nasa.gov; s.ismail@larc.nasa.gov; w.b.grant@larc.nasa.gov)
Regular paper

DOI: 10.1007/s003400050523

Cite this article as:
Browell, E., Ismail, S. & Grant, W. Appl Phys B (1998) 67: 399. doi:10.1007/s003400050523

The technology and applications of the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique have progressed significantly since the first DIAL measurements of Schotland [1], and airborne DIAL measurements of ozone and water vapor are frequently being made in a wide range of field experiments. In addition, plans are underway to develop DIAL systems for use on satellites for continuous global measurements. This paper will highlight the history of airborne lidar and DIAL systems, summarize the major accomplishments of the NASA Langley DIAL program, and discuss specifications and goals for DIAL systems in space.

PACS: 42.68.Wt; 92.60.Jq; 92.60.Sz; 07.87.+v

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1998