Applied Physics B

, Volume 75, Issue 2, pp 317–327

The application of quasi-phase-matched parametric light sources to practical infrared chemical sensing systems

  • T.J. Kulp
  • S.E. Bisson
  • R.P. Bambha
  • T.A. Reichardt
  • U.-B. Goers
  • K.W. Aniolek
  • D.A.V. Kliner
  • B.A. Richman
  • K.M. Armstrong
  • R. Sommers
  • R. Schmitt
  • P.E. Powers
  • O. Levi
  • T. Pinguet
  • M. Fejer
  • J.P. Koplow
  • L. Goldberg
  • T.G. McRae

DOI: 10.1007/s00340-002-0978-5

Cite this article as:
Kulp, T., Bisson, S., Bambha, R. et al. Appl Phys B (2002) 75: 317. doi:10.1007/s00340-002-0978-5

Abstract.

Quasi-phase-matched (QPM) materials allow the generation of spectroscopically useful infrared radiation in an efficient and broadly tunable format. Here, we describe several applications of QPM-based light sources to remote and local chemical sensing. The remote systems are gas imagers that employ a fiber-pumped continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator or a microlaser-pumped, diode-seeded optical parametric amplifier as the illumination source. Technology described for local sensing includes a cavity ring down spectrometer that employs a novel optical parametric generator–amplifier to achieve ≥350 cm-1 of contiguous tuning and a long-wave infrared light source based on QPM GaAs. In each case the use of QPM materials in conjunction with effective pump sources instills simplicity and ruggedness into the sensing systems.

PACS: 42.65.Yj; 42.68.Wt; 82.80.Gk

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • T.J. Kulp
    • 1
  • S.E. Bisson
    • 1
  • R.P. Bambha
    • 1
  • T.A. Reichardt
    • 1
  • U.-B. Goers
    • 1
  • K.W. Aniolek
    • 1
  • D.A.V. Kliner
    • 1
  • B.A. Richman
    • 1
  • K.M. Armstrong
    • 1
  • R. Sommers
    • 1
  • R. Schmitt
    • 1
  • P.E. Powers
    • 2
  • O. Levi
    • 3
  • T. Pinguet
    • 3
  • M. Fejer
    • 3
  • J.P. Koplow
    • 4
  • L. Goldberg
    • 4
  • T.G. McRae
    • 5
  1. 1.Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550-0969, USAUS
  2. 2.Department of Physics, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469-2314, USAUS
  3. 3.E.L. Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USAUS
  4. 4.Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5672, USAUS
  5. 5.Laser Imaging Systems, Punta Gorda, FL 33983, USAUS