Applied Physics A

, Volume 105, Issue 3, pp 629–633

Growth of thin films of low molecular weight proteins by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

  • A. Matei
  • J. Schou
  • C. Constantinescu
  • P. Kingshott
  • M. Dinescu
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00339-011-6602-y

Cite this article as:
Matei, A., Schou, J., Constantinescu, C. et al. Appl. Phys. A (2011) 105: 629. doi:10.1007/s00339-011-6602-y

Abstract

Thin films of lysozyme and myoglobin grown by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) from a water ice matrix have been investigated. The deposition rate of these two low molecular weight proteins (lysozyme: 14307 amu and myoglobin: 17083 amu) exhibits a maximum of about 1–2 ng/cm2 per pulse at a fluence of 1–2 J/cm2 and decreases slowly with increasing fluence. This rate is presumably determined by the matrix rather by the proteins. A significant fraction of the proteins are intact in the film as determined by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) spectrometry. The results for lysozyme demonstrate that the fragmentation rate of the proteins during the MAPLE process is not influenced by the pH of the water solution prior to freezing.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Matei
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Schou
    • 1
  • C. Constantinescu
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Kingshott
    • 3
  • M. Dinescu
    • 2
  1. 1.DTU Fotonik, Risø CampusTechnical University of DenmarkRoskildeDenmark
  2. 2.National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation PhysicsMagurele-BucharestRomania
  3. 3.Industrial Research Institute Swinburne (IRIS)Swinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia