Applied Physics A

, Volume 80, Issue 5, pp 1045–1047

Atomic transport and chemical stability of nitrogen in ultrathin HfSiON gate dielectrics

Authors

  • C. Driemeier
    • Instituto de Física – UFRGS
  • K.P. Bastos
    • Instituto de Física – UFRGS
  • G.V. Soares
    • Instituto de Física – UFRGS
  • L. Miotti
    • Instituto de Física – UFRGS
  • R.P. Pezzi
    • Instituto de Física – UFRGS
    • Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas – UCS
  • P. Punchaipetch
    • Department of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Texas at Dallas
  • G. Pant
    • Department of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Texas at Dallas
  • B.E. Gnade
    • Department of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Texas at Dallas
  • R.M. Wallace
    • Department of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Texas at Dallas
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00339-004-3037-8

Cite this article as:
Driemeier, C., Bastos, K., Soares, G. et al. Appl. Phys. A (2005) 80: 1045. doi:10.1007/s00339-004-3037-8

Abstract

HfSiO and HfSiON films with thicknesses compatible with the requirements for gate dielectrics alternatives to SiO2 in ultra-large scale integration silicon-based CMOSFET devices were deposited on an ultrathin HfSiO15N interfacial layer on Si(001). These structures were submitted to thermal processing routines typical of post-deposition annealing and dopant activation steps in fabrication technology, namely at 450 or 1000 °C, respectively, and in atmospheres of N2 and/or O2. N transport and loss were determined by nuclear reaction analysis, including sub-nanometric depth resolution profiling with narrow nuclear reaction resonances. The chemical states of N were accessed by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. After annealing at 450 °C, N is seen to be mobile, whereas the chemical environment of N is not changed at this temperature. Annealing at 1000 °C renders N mobile and its most abundant chemical state in near-surface regions is unstable. Annealing in O2 atmosphere promotes incorporation of O from the gas phase into the films, partly in exchange for N and O atoms and partly by net incorporation of oxygen in the films. The profiles of the newly incorporated O atoms are also determined with sub-nanometric depth resolution by narrow nuclear reaction resonance profiling.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004