Coral Reefs

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 35–44

Occurrence of the putatively heat-tolerant Symbiodinium phylotype D in high-latitudinal outlying coral communities

  • Yi-T. Lien
  • Y. Nakano
  • S. Plathong
  • H. Fukami
  • Jih-T. Wang
  • C. A. Chen
Report

DOI: 10.1007/s00338-006-0185-7

Cite this article as:
Lien, YT., Nakano, Y., Plathong, S. et al. Coral Reefs (2007) 26: 35. doi:10.1007/s00338-006-0185-7

Abstract

Biogeographic investigations have suggested that coral-symbiont associations can adapt to higher temperatures by hosting a heat-tolerant Symbiodinium, phylotype D. It is hypothesized that phylotype D is absent in high latitudes due to its heat-tolerant characteristics. In this study, this hypothesis was tested by examining the symbiont diversity in a scleractinian coral, Oulastrea crispata, throughout its entire latitudinal distribution range in the West Pacific. Molecular phylotyping of the 5′-end of the nuclear large subunit of ribosomal DNA (lsu rDNA) indicated that phylotype D was the dominant Symbiodinium in O. crispata from the tropical reefs to the marginal non-reefal coral communities. Several colonies of tropical populations were associated with phylotype C, either alone or simultaneously with phylotype D. Analysis of the polymerase chain reaction products using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) detected relatively low densities of phylotype C in most of the O. crispata colonies surveyed. These results provide evidence for the occurrence of phylotype D in cold-water outlying coral communities. The dominant occurrence of phylotype C in some O. crispata colonies on tropical reefs and the relatively low densities of phylotype C identified by SSCP in subtropical and temperate populations show that the dominant symbiont type can vary in this coral species and that multiple symbionts can co-occur in the same host.

Keywords

Coral bleaching Symbiodinium Phylotype Heat tolerant PCR-RFLP SSCP 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yi-T. Lien
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Nakano
    • 2
  • S. Plathong
    • 3
  • H. Fukami
    • 4
  • Jih-T. Wang
    • 5
  • C. A. Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Center for BiodiversityAcademia SinicaTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Sesoko Station, Tropical Biosphere Research CenterUniversity of RyukyusOkinawaJapan
  3. 3.Department of BiologyPrince of Songkla UniversitySongklaThailand
  4. 4.Seto Marine Biological StationThe Kyoto UniversityShirayamaJapan
  5. 5.Department of BiotechnologyTajen University of Science and TechnologyYanpu, PingtungTaiwan

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