Coral Reefs

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 53–68

Carbonate production of an emergent reef platform, Warraber Island, Torres Strait, Australia

Report

DOI: 10.1007/s00338-006-0168-8

Cite this article as:
Hart, D.E. & Kench, P.S. Coral Reefs (2007) 26: 53. doi:10.1007/s00338-006-0168-8

Abstract

Complex relationships exist between tropical reef ecology, carbonate (CaCO3) production and carbonate sinks. This paper investigated census-based techniques for determining the distribution and carbonate production of reef organisms on an emergent platform in central Torres Strait, Australia, and compared the contemporary budget with geological findings to infer shifts in reef productivity over the late Holocene. Results indicate that contemporary carbonate production varies by several orders of magnitude between and within the different reef-flat sub-environments depending on cover type and extent. Average estimated reef-flat production was 1.66 ± 1.78 kg m−2 year−1 (mean ± SD) although only 23% of the area was covered by carbonate producers. Collectively, these organisms produce 17,399 ± 18,618 t CaCO3 year−1, with production dominated by coral (73%) and subordinate contributions by encrusting coralline algae (18%) articulated coralline algae, molluscs, foraminifera and Halimeda (<4%). Comparisons between the production of these organisms across the different reef-flat zones, surface sediment composition and accumulation rates calculated from cores indicate that it is necessary to understand the spatial distribution, density and production of each major organism when considering the types and amounts of carbonate available for storage in the various reef carbonate sinks. These findings raise questions as to the reliability of using modal production rates in global models independent of ecosystem investigation, in particular, indicating that current models may overestimate reef productivity in emergent settings.

Keywords

CalcificationCarbonate productionReef flatTorres StraitCoralMolluscs

Supplementary material

338_2006_168_MOESM1_ESM.doc (146 kb)
Supplementary material

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeographyUniversity of CanterburyChristchurchNew Zealand
  2. 2.School of Geography and Environmental ScienceUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand