Mammalian Genome

, Volume 20, Issue 7, pp 414–423

A Cmv2 QTL on chromosome X affects MCMV resistance in New Zealand male mice

  • Marisela R. Rodriguez
  • Alyssa Lundgren
  • Pearl Sabastian
  • Qian Li
  • Gary Churchill
  • Michael G. Brown
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00335-009-9203-8

Cite this article as:
Rodriguez, M.R., Lundgren, A., Sabastian, P. et al. Mamm Genome (2009) 20: 414. doi:10.1007/s00335-009-9203-8

Abstract

NK cell-mediated resistance to viruses is subject to genetic control in humans and mice. Here we used classical and quantitative genetic strategies to examine NK-mediated murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) control in genealogically related New Zealand white (NZW) and black (NZB) mice. NZW mice display NK cell-dependent MCMV resistance while NZB NK cells fail to limit viral replication after infection. Unlike Ly49H+ NK resistance in C57BL/6 mice, NZW NK-mediated MCMV control was Ly49H-independent. Instead, MCMV resistance in NZW (Cmv2) involves multiple genetic factors. To establish the genetic basis of Cmv2 resistance, we further characterized a major chromosome X-linked resistance locus (DXMit216) responsible for innate MCMV control in NZW × NZB crosses. We found that the DXMit216 locus affects early MCMV control in New Zealand F2 crosses and demonstrate that the NZB-derived DXMit216 allele enhances viral resistance in F2 males. The evolutionary conservation of the DXMit216 region in mice and humans suggests that a Cmv2-related mechanism may affect human antiviral responses.

Supplementary material

335_2009_9203_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (6.6 mb)
(PDF 6733 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marisela R. Rodriguez
    • 1
    • 4
  • Alyssa Lundgren
    • 1
  • Pearl Sabastian
    • 1
  • Qian Li
    • 3
  • Gary Churchill
    • 3
  • Michael G. Brown
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Virginia School of MedicineCharlottesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineUniversity of Virginia School of MedicineCharlottesvilleUSA
  3. 3.The Jackson LaboratoryBar HarborUSA
  4. 4.Department of Internal Medicine, Division of RheumatologyWashington University in St. Louis Medical CenterSt. LouisUSA

Personalised recommendations