Vegetation History and Archaeobotany

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 419–433

Insight into the environment of a pre-Roman Iron Age hillfort at Vladař, Czech Republic, using a multi-proxy approach

Authors

    • Institute of ArchaeologyAcademy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
  • Nicole Boenke
    • Archäologische & Archäobotanische Untersuchungen
  • Miloslav Chytráček
    • Institute of ArchaeologyAcademy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
  • Kateřina Nováková
    • Faculty of Biological Sciences, Department of BotanyUniversity of South Bohemia
  • Jiří Sádlo
    • Institute of BotanyAcademy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
  • Josef Veselý
    • Czech Geological Survey
  • Petr Kuneš
    • Department of BotanyCharles University in Prague
  • Vlasta Jankovská
    • Institute of BotanyAcademy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00334-006-0064-8

Cite this article as:
Pokorný, P., Boenke, N., Chytráček, M. et al. Veget Hist Archaeobot (2006) 15: 419. doi:10.1007/s00334-006-0064-8

Abstract

The large fortified hilltop site of Vladař, northwest Bohemia, Czech Republic (50°05′N, 13°13′E), has recently been studied intensively by way of environmental archaeology, in which palaeoecological methods have played a crucial role. The latter include the analyses of pollen, green algae, Cladocera, other microfossils, plant macro-remains (including charcoal and wood) and chemical composition, carried out on the wet sediments from an artificial cistern/pond situated in the middle of the large citadel, supplemented by charcoal and wood analysis on material from dry situations. The continuous palaeoecological record consists of well-preserved biological remains and covers the period from ca. 400 b.c. to recent times. The chronology is primarily based on radiocarbon dating, supplemented by archaeological finds. The main focus is on the La Tène period of the Iron Age. During the early to middle La Tène the hillfort had a considerable number of permanent inhabitants and woodland was almost completely replaced by an agricultural landscape. The site became partly abandoned by the end of the 3rd century b.c. and completely abandoned around the birth of Christ, after which it reverted to natural woodland communities.

Keywords

Pollen analysisPlant macro-remainsCladoceraLand-use historyLa TèneBohemia

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006