Chest

European Radiology

, Volume 16, Issue 11, pp 2483-2490

First online:

Hyperpolarized 3helium magnetic resonance ventilation imaging of the lung in cystic fibrosis: comparison with high resolution CT and spirometry

  • Colm J. McMahonAffiliated withDepartment of Radiology, St. Vincent’s University Hospital Email author 
  • , Jonathan D. DoddAffiliated withDepartment of Radiology, St. Vincent’s University Hospital
  • , Catherine HillAffiliated withThe Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire Hospital
  • , Neil WoodhouseAffiliated withThe Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire Hospital
  • , Jim M. WildAffiliated withThe Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire Hospital
  • , Stan FicheleAffiliated withThe Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire Hospital
  • , Charles G. GallagherAffiliated withDepartment of National Referral Centre for Adult Cystic Fibrosis, St. Vincent’s University Hospital
  • , Stephen J. SkehanAffiliated withDepartment of Radiology, St. Vincent’s University Hospital
  • , Edwin J. R. van BeekAffiliated withThe Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire HospitalDepartment of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa
    • , James B. MastersonAffiliated withDepartment of Radiology, St. Vincent’s University Hospital

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare hyperpolarized 3helium magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) of the lungs in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and spirometry. Eight patients with stable CF prospectively underwent 3He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry within 1 week. Three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequence was used during an 18-s breath-hold following inhalation of hyperpolarized 3He. Each lung was divided into six zones; 3He MRI was scored as percentage ventilation per lung zone. HRCT was scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Univariate (Spearman rank) and multivariate correlations were performed between 3He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry. Results are expressed as mean±SD (range). Spirometry is expressed as percent predicted. There were four men and four women, mean age=31.9±9 (20–46). Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV)1=52%±29 (27–93). Mean 3He MRI score=74%±25 (55–100). Mean HRCT score=48.8±24 (13.5–83). The correlation between3He MRI and HRCT was strong (R=±0.89, p<0.001). Bronchiectasis was the only independent predictor of 3He MRI; 3He MRI correlated better with FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) (R=0.86 and 0.93, p<0.01, respectively) than HRCT (R=±0.72 and ±0.81, p<0.05, respectively). This study showed that 3He MRI correlates strongly with structural HRCT abnormalities and is a stronger correlate of spirometry than HRCT in CF.

Keywords

Cystic fibrosis Helium Lung Magnetic resonance (MR) Contrast enhancement Nuclei other than H