European Radiology

, Volume 16, Issue 12, pp 2700–2711

MR features of physiologic and benign conditions of the ovary

  • Ken Tamai
  • Takashi Koyama
  • Tsuneo Saga
  • Aki Kido
  • Masako Kataoka
  • Shigeaki Umeoka
  • Shingo Fujii
  • Kaori Togashi
Urogenital

DOI: 10.1007/s00330-006-0302-6

Cite this article as:
Tamai, K., Koyama, T., Saga, T. et al. Eur Radiol (2006) 16: 2700. doi:10.1007/s00330-006-0302-6

Abstract

In reproductive women, various physiologic conditions can cause morphologic changes of the ovary, resembling pathologic conditions. Benign ovarian diseases can also simulate malignancies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can play an important role in establishing accurate diagnosis. Functional cysts should not be confused with cystic neoplasms. Corpus luteum cysts typically have a thick wall and are occasionally hemorrhagic. Multicystic lesions that may mimic cystic neoplasms include hyperreactio luteinalis, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Recognition of clinical settings can help establish diagnosis. In endometrial cysts, MRI usually provides specific diagnosis; however, decidual change during pregnancy should not be confused with secondary neoplasm. Peritoneal inclusion cysts can be distinguished from cystic neoplasms by recognition of their characteristic configurations. Ovarian torsion and massive ovarian edema may mimic solid malignant tumors. Recognition of normal follicles and anatomic structures is useful in diagnosing these conditions. In pelvic inflammatory diseases, transfascial spread of the lesion should not be confused with invasive malignant tumors. Radiologic identification of abscess formation can be a diagnostic clue. Many benign tumors, including teratoma, Brenner tumor, and sex-cord stromal tumor, frequently show characteristic MRI features. Knowledge of MRI features of these conditions is essential in establishing accurate diagnosis and determining appropriate treatment.

Keywords

MRIOvaryPhysiologic changeBenign condition

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ken Tamai
    • 1
  • Takashi Koyama
    • 2
  • Tsuneo Saga
    • 1
  • Aki Kido
    • 1
  • Masako Kataoka
    • 1
  • Shigeaki Umeoka
    • 1
  • Shingo Fujii
    • 3
  • Kaori Togashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of MedicineKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyKyoto University HospitalKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Graduate School of MedicineKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan